Asking Questions
Has Susan been to France twice?

Asking Questions

Who, why, what and when are all words used when asking questions. We ask questions without giving much thought to how we actually construct a question. In English, there are two main ways of forming a question: either by inverting the subject and the main verb or by the use of an auxiliary verb (a helping verb).

Here are two examples:

  • 'He is swimming in the lake. - Is he swimming in the lake?' (inversion)
  • 'He studies hard. - Does he study hard? (does is the auxiliary/helping verb).

One thing you must always remember when writing a question - the question mark at the end. You shouldn't have too many problems with this 11-plus quiz.

Good luck!

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  1. Change the sentence below into a question.
    He lost his keys last night.
    Use the auxiliary/helping verb 'did' and write the main verb in its dictionary form: 'lose'. Use did for he/she/it and for I/you/we/they. The dictionary form of the verb has NO endings, for example: 'work', 'eat', 'revise', 'help', and so on
  2. Change the sentence below into a question.
    She likes horses.
    Use the auxiliary/helping verb do/does and write the main verb in its dictionary form: 'like'. Use does for he/she/it and do for I/you/we/they. The dictionary form of the verb has NO endings, for example: 'work', 'eat', 'revise', 'help', and so on
  3. Change the sentence below into a question.
    It was raining yesterday.
    The question is formed by simple inversion of 'it' and 'was'. DON'T FORGET the question mark!
  4. Change the sentence below into a question.
    They died in the Great War.
    Use the auxiliary/helping verb 'did' and write the main verb in its dictionary form: 'die'. Use did for he/she/it and for I/you/we/they. The dictionary form of the verb has NO endings, for example: 'work', 'eat', 'revise', 'help', and so on
  5. Change the sentence below into a question.
    He built his own house.
    Use the auxiliary/helping verb 'did' and write the main verb in its dictionary form: 'build'. Use did for he/she/it and for I/you/we/they. The dictionary form of the verb has NO endings, for example: 'work', 'eat', 'revise', 'help', and so on
  6. Change the sentence below into a question.
    Susan has been to France twice.
    The question is formed by simple inversion of 'Susan' and 'has'. DON'T FORGET the question mark!
  7. Change the sentence below into a question.
    He had seen all the films before.
    The question is formed by simple inversion of 'he' and 'had'. DON'T FORGET the question mark!
  8. Change the sentence below into a question.
    He works very hard.
    Use the auxiliary/helping verb do/does and write the main verb in its dictionary form: 'work'. Use does for he/she/it and do for I/you/we/they. The dictionary form of the verb has NO endings, for example: 'work', 'eat', 'revise', 'help', and so on
  9. Change the sentence below into a question.
    She is beautiful.
    The question is formed by simple inversion of 'she' and 'is'. DON'T FORGET the question mark!
  10. Change the sentence below into a question.
    He can run very fast.
    The question is formed by simple inversion of 'he' and 'can'. DON'T FORGET the question mark!

Author: Frank Evans

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