Same Meaning 4
Alchemists were mysterious people in olden times.

Same Meaning 4

This 11-Plus Verbal Reasoning Same Meaning quiz asks you to find an equivalent word.

In this last of our Same Meaning quizzes, as with the previous ones, all you need to do is to find the answer which offers the closest equivalent to the word in CAPITALS in each question.

As with all our 11-plus verbal reasoning quizzes, it's worth revisiting those that you find hard until you manage to get all questions correct. If you want to pass the 11+ exam, you'll need to be good at all the various types found in the 11-Plus category. Don't worry if you aren't a genius in every single type - most people struggle with one or two, either relating to numbers or words.

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  1. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    When we moved into the our new house, there was still a RESIDUAL tang in the basement from the smelly chemicals the previous people's son had been using in connection with one of his hobbies.
    'Residual' = still present (like the scent of long-gone domestic fireplace smoke on ancient books, sheet music or other documents). It has nothing to do with 'resin', nor (at all directly) with the idea of a new 'residence' as such
  2. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    There were also weeds growing in great PROFUSION around the old shed at the far end of the garden.
    'A profusion' of anything simply means a great quantity, as though the substance had melted or been poured out.
    'Clumps' is probably true in this particular context, but is almost too specific and would not work in some other situations, e.g. a profusion of new road-signs
  3. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    After all, he had put up with months of illness and indignity with commendable STOICISM.
    The Stoics were a group of classical philosophers who believed it noble to tolerate life's difficulties without complaining to other people about them. Someone who has been very ill may well have wanted to moan (literally, and otherwise) but perhaps felt it was better 'to suffer in relative silence' instead of making those near to them even more miserable about the situation. Often the word is now used in the sense that the person is almost too heroic for their own good, and could have done with 'letting it all out a bit more' and sharing.
    A true Stoic may have suffered in noble silence, but would have felt no need to go so far as to show any (probably false) 'good humour' instead (Answer 3)
  4. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    She is remarkably alert and sprightly for a NONAGENARIAN.
    An octagenarian is one in their eighties, and this present example is a person a decade older than that
  5. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    The gangling lad we used to know has now developed into a SUAVE young man.
    'Suave' = smooth in speech and manner (possibly a little bit too much so for comfort; as though one might have doubts about trusting them)
  6. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    Alchemists were mysterious people in olden times who were convinced they could discover a means of TRANSMUTING 'base metal' into finest gold.
    'Trans-' in Latin means 'across' (as in Translation and Transport); the '-mut-' element suggests change, as in a Commuter (shuttling back and forth between home and work), or 'mutants' and 'mutations' (things that have changed from the original version). 'Transmuting' means 'changing over'. Alchemists believed there was a wonderful secret to this process, in the days before the true chemical and atomic nature of the elements had been established. We now know this was only ever a fool's errand!
  7. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    After his meeting with the bank manager, he left the office feeling quite DEFLATED.
    'Deflate' is the opposite of 'inflate' (to pump up with air, such as with a balloon): the image is of someone who has had all the breath, energy, or 'fibre' or 'stuffing' knocked out of them, probably by hearing bad financial or family news
  8. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    She was advised to arrange a period of CONVALESCENCE in a suitably quiet and healthy location.
    'Convalescence' comes from three Latin word-elements: 'con'- meaning 'together' (here, as in 'coming back into one healthy piece'); the 'val' as in 'value' and 'valid', suggesting being fit for purpose; and the '-scence' element, suggesting a process of change (such as 'adolescence'). Taken as a whole, it means 'a time and process of getting oneself back together into a normal state'.
    This is not the same as 'healing' (Answer 1) which suggests outside input in the form of medical attention, pills and potions etc (though these might perfectly well also be involved). A sensible amount of seclusion (Answers 3 & 4) may well also be reasonable to help the process along without putting further strain on the patient; but that doesn't mean that these are the same thing
  9. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    You might not believe it to look at him now, but as a baby he had beautiful golden LOCKS.
    Occasionally people still refer to 'a lock of hair' (perhaps as a memento of a lover, or of someone who has gone away): the plural is 'locks' as one wold expect. This has nothing at all to do with the 'security' sense of 'lock', nor the mechanism for moving boats and water between different levels on a canal or river
  10. Pick the Answer which expresses most closely the idea in CAPITALS in the original sentence.
    They went through the initial formalities of the meeting in a PERFUNCTORY manner.
    'Perfunctory' = as swift as possible, for the sake of official procedure, but with little sign of genuine respect or commitment to the traditional formalities

Author: Ian Miles

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