Religions - Christianity Quiz - One Holy Happy Family 2 (Questions)

As you may have seen from our previous Quiz on One Holy Happy Family, Christians are a very big and varied 'family'. It's time to meet some more 'relatives', and observe some of the distinctive things that they believe and do!

1. 'Unlike in the Christian heartlands of Europe and around the Mediterranean, we never have snow at Christmas, and Easter is associated with autumn imagery rather than spring and rebirth ('daffodil trumpets' etc.). Where in the world are we fellow-Christians?'
[ ] China
[ ] The Caribbean
[ ] Australia and New Zealand
[ ] Canada
2. 'In our place of worship, God's Word is of supreme importance, more so even than a communion service. When we do have communion, this is not taken from one large common chalice, but in small individual glasses (so you would notice the holes for these along the top of our altar-rail), and the wine we use is non-alcoholic. Our founders, meanwhile, after whom we are quite often alternatively called Wesleyans, also established a robust musical tradition. Who, or what, are we?'
[ ] Mormons
[ ] Moonies
[ ] Methodists
[ ] Mennonites
3. Most 'western' Christians celebrate Christmas on 25 December, but we traditionally mark it two weeks later. Who are we?
[ ] Eastern Orthodox
[ ] Church in China
[ ] Indian Christian Church
[ ] Jesuits
4. Which of the following is NOT an established centre of Christian pilgrimage?
[ ] Compostela
[ ] Canterbury
[ ] Cologne
[ ] Cappadocia
5. In households and institutions within many Christian traditions, it is customary to follow Jesus' example and offer a prayer of thanks before tucking into a shared meal. What is the usual name for such a prayer?
[ ] The Grace
[ ] Grace
[ ] Thanksgiving
[ ] The Blessing
6. 'There are currently about a quarter of a million of us, based mainly in ancestral communities in Pennsylvania, but the one thing most people recognise about us is that we hardly look like modern North Americans: we speak an older Germanic language, dress in the manner of two or three centuries past, and in general have as little as we can to do with such things as cars or electricity. We are known also for our young-adult baptism, our strict but fair ways of family life, and the lovely occasions where a community literally 'pulls together' for a barn-raising. Who are we?'
[ ] Quakers
[ ] Amish
[ ] Plymouth Brethren
[ ] Ammonites
7. Unlike many other branches of the Christian Church, these people hold that there are only two Sacraments (Baptism, and 'the Lord's Supper', known more widely as Communion or the Eucharist) ... since a guiding doctrine, over the 400+ years of their history, is not to allow or encourage anything in worship unless it is specifically and positively authorised in Scripture. There is a strong sense of overlap with Scotland, not least through the formative influence of John Knox (whose house can be visited on Edinburgh's Royal Mile), though this denomination is also active elsewhere in the British Isles and in many older 'colonial' parts of the world such as North America and the Antipodes (Australia / New Zealand). Despite being a worldwide church, for important historical reasons they have no Bishops. Who are these people?
[ ] Free Church of Scotland
[ ] Presbyterians
[ ] Pentecostalists
[ ] The Kirk
8. 'The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints' , with most of its roots and followers in the United States, is more widely and simply known as ...
[ ] The Methodists
[ ] The Mormons
[ ] The Moonies
[ ] The Moravians
9. This is another US-based Christian organisation, probably best recognised from its clean-living missionaries who call, in pairs, on people door-to-door, often offering copies of their Watchtower magazine. Some of their elders were jailed as spies during World War 1 since their pacifist beliefs did not allow them to engage in any way with the national war effort. Their worship premises are known as a Kingdom Hall, and among their specific beliefs they do not recognise the generally mainstream Christian doctrine of the Trinity. Who are they?
[ ] Pentecostalists
[ ] Jehovah's Witnesses
[ ] Church of God
[ ] Seventh-Day Adventists
10. Founded by Mary Baker Eddy in the late 19th century, this religious organisation holds that illness can generally be rectified through prayer. This has resulted in awkward cases where, for instance, believing parents have steadfastly refused 'conventional' medical aid for or to their children with a range of serious conditions. What is this movement called?
[ ] Spiritualism
[ ] Christian Science
[ ] Revivalism
[ ] Scientology

 

Religions - Christianity Quiz - One Holy Happy Family 2 (Answers)
1. 'Unlike in the Christian heartlands of Europe and around the Mediterranean, we never have snow at Christmas, and Easter is associated with autumn imagery rather than spring and rebirth ('daffodil trumpets' etc.). Where in the world are we fellow-Christians?'
[ ] China
[ ] The Caribbean
[x] Australia and New Zealand
[ ] Canada
'We' must be in the Southern Hemisphere for the seasons to be 'upside down'. Your author has happy memories of playing a Sunday morning service at the turn of a calendar year (in this case 2008) on the S Island of New Zealand, in his shorts, summer shirt and sandals, with the blazing midsummer sun shining through the stained glass chapel windows as we sang traditional Euro-centric carols about sheep in the snow. It didn't half feel strange! But this is an entirely valid annual experience for Christians in the southern hemisphere. Their joint symbolism of Easter and the harvest also puts a refreshingly different complexion on the liturgical year.
2. 'In our place of worship, God's Word is of supreme importance, more so even than a communion service. When we do have communion, this is not taken from one large common chalice, but in small individual glasses (so you would notice the holes for these along the top of our altar-rail), and the wine we use is non-alcoholic. Our founders, meanwhile, after whom we are quite often alternatively called Wesleyans, also established a robust musical tradition. Who, or what, are we?'
[ ] Mormons
[ ] Moonies
[x] Methodists
[ ] Mennonites
It happens that there are an interesting number of denominations and offshoots of the church whose titles begin with M, but we suspect the Methodists would consider at least some of the alternative Answers offered here to be strange company.
3. Most 'western' Christians celebrate Christmas on 25 December, but we traditionally mark it two weeks later. Who are we?
[x] Eastern Orthodox
[ ] Church in China
[ ] Indian Christian Church
[ ] Jesuits
The Orthodox churches follow the traditional Julian Calendar, so their Christmas more or less coincides with western celebrations of Epiphany (&/or 'Twelfth Night'), about a week into the next calendar year.
4. Which of the following is NOT an established centre of Christian pilgrimage?
[ ] Compostela
[ ] Canterbury
[ ] Cologne
[x] Cappadocia
Cappadocia has a venerable Christian history but is not a pilgrimage centre as such; the top three Answers refer to the St James pilgrimage route into Spain; Thomas a Becket's shrine in Kent; and the Shrine of the Three Kings.
5. In households and institutions within many Christian traditions, it is customary to follow Jesus' example and offer a prayer of thanks before tucking into a shared meal. What is the usual name for such a prayer?
[ ] The Grace
[x] Grace
[ ] Thanksgiving
[ ] The Blessing
'The Grace' (Answer 1) is another widespread prayer used at the end of services and gatherings, and comes from v.14 of chapter 13 of Paul's second letter to the Corinthians. 'Grace' in the mealtime sense derives from a Latin word for 'thanks' (as in 'gratitude'). Thanksgiving is a north American festival in early December, while The Blessing is a more formal end-of-service prayer.
6. 'There are currently about a quarter of a million of us, based mainly in ancestral communities in Pennsylvania, but the one thing most people recognise about us is that we hardly look like modern North Americans: we speak an older Germanic language, dress in the manner of two or three centuries past, and in general have as little as we can to do with such things as cars or electricity. We are known also for our young-adult baptism, our strict but fair ways of family life, and the lovely occasions where a community literally 'pulls together' for a barn-raising. Who are we?'
[ ] Quakers
[x] Amish
[ ] Plymouth Brethren
[ ] Ammonites
The Amish maintain, even today, in the relative wilds of their American homelands, a simple and honourable lifestyle modelled on that of around 1700 (i.e., about ten or a dozen generations ago). For a partial insight into their way of life, see the classic film The Witness, and/or research the Amish further online.
7. Unlike many other branches of the Christian Church, these people hold that there are only two Sacraments (Baptism, and 'the Lord's Supper', known more widely as Communion or the Eucharist) ... since a guiding doctrine, over the 400+ years of their history, is not to allow or encourage anything in worship unless it is specifically and positively authorised in Scripture. There is a strong sense of overlap with Scotland, not least through the formative influence of John Knox (whose house can be visited on Edinburgh's Royal Mile), though this denomination is also active elsewhere in the British Isles and in many older 'colonial' parts of the world such as North America and the Antipodes (Australia / New Zealand). Despite being a worldwide church, for important historical reasons they have no Bishops. Who are these people?
[ ] Free Church of Scotland
[x] Presbyterians
[ ] Pentecostalists
[ ] The Kirk
The Free Church of Scotland (Answer 1) are a smaller section within the Presbyterian Church; 'The Kirk' (Answer 4) is an ambivalent label in that it can just as easily refer to the Church of Scotland.
8. 'The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints' , with most of its roots and followers in the United States, is more widely and simply known as ...
[ ] The Methodists
[x] The Mormons
[ ] The Moonies
[ ] The Moravians
Their main headquarters is at Salt Lake City.
9. This is another US-based Christian organisation, probably best recognised from its clean-living missionaries who call, in pairs, on people door-to-door, often offering copies of their Watchtower magazine. Some of their elders were jailed as spies during World War 1 since their pacifist beliefs did not allow them to engage in any way with the national war effort. Their worship premises are known as a Kingdom Hall, and among their specific beliefs they do not recognise the generally mainstream Christian doctrine of the Trinity. Who are they?
[ ] Pentecostalists
[x] Jehovah's Witnesses
[ ] Church of God
[ ] Seventh-Day Adventists
Along with the other groups and denominations we have touched upon, the 'JW's' can be researched in detail online by those interested in the origins and distinctive minutiae of their worship and practices.
10. Founded by Mary Baker Eddy in the late 19th century, this religious organisation holds that illness can generally be rectified through prayer. This has resulted in awkward cases where, for instance, believing parents have steadfastly refused 'conventional' medical aid for or to their children with a range of serious conditions. What is this movement called?
[ ] Spiritualism
[x] Christian Science
[ ] Revivalism
[ ] Scientology
This movement is also worth reading more about if you have the time and inclination.