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Grammar 30 - Conditionals - Probable
"I'll let you drive my car if you pass your exams." - Here IF is a conditional.

Grammar 30 - Conditionals - Probable

This is the first of five High English grammar quizzes looking at conditionals. It focusses in particular on Probable Conditionals - formed with 'if' or 'should'.

As the name suggests, conditionals impose a condition in a sentence. Either one event follows from another, or it depends on the other. Here's an example:

‘I’ll let you drive my car IF you perform well in your exams.’

In this sentence the word in capitals imposes a condition for the son to drive the car (one event), which is to perform well in exams (second event). The son’s driving the car depends on the performance of the son in the exams.

There are three types of conditionals – probable, hypothetical and impossible. In this quiz we study probable conditionals. Again, as the name suggests, in probable conditionals there is a likelihood of an event happening if the condition is met. The correct grammar to use in a sentence involving probable conditionals follows this pattern - 'If + subordinate clause in present tense followed by the main clause in future tense'. In the example above we notice that the main clause is ‘I’ll let you drive my car’ and the subordinate clause is ‘if you perform well in your exams.’ The rules of grammar also allow us to interchange the order of the clauses and write ‘If you perform well in your exams, I’ll let you drive my car.’ We notice that in this form we have inserted a comma.

Generally, the probable conditionals follow the form ‘If + subordinate clause in present tense followed by main clause in future tense’ but it is possible that other tense forms are made use of. Sometimes, it is also possible that we use ‘should’ in place of ‘if’ and these forms are used more in formal contexts. Should you have any doubts regarding the use of probable conditionals, then get them clarified by taking this quiz!

1.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
If the BCCI does not accede to the cricketers' demands, they are threatening to boycott the next test series.
If the BCCI does not accede to the cricketers' demands, they are threat to boycott the next test series.
If the BCCI does not accede to the cricketers' demands, they have threatening to boycott the next test series.
If the BCCI does not accede to the cricketers' demands, they threatening to boycott the next test series.
Remember, the probable conditional takes the form ‘If + subordinate clause in present tense followed by main clause in future tense.’ However, the main clause can also take a present continuous tense form as in this case. The other options are grammatically wrong
2.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
If you have furnished the details, I'll entered them in the log book.
If you have furnished the details, I'll enter them in the log book.
If you have furnish the details, I'll enter them in the log book.
If you have furnishing the details, I'll enter them in the log book.
Remember, the probable conditional takes the form ‘If + subordinate clause in present tense followed by main clause in future tense.’ However, the subordinate clause can also take a present perfect tense form as in this case. The other options are grammatically wrong
3.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
If I'm not grounded, I'll go to the movies.
I'm not grounded. I'll go to the movies.
I'll go to the movies, if I'm not grounded.
If I'm not grounded I'll go to the movies.
Remember the form that probable conditionals take. We don't use the comma when we begin with the main clause and we do use the comma when we begin with the subordinate clause. In option 4 the sentences are separate and they are not connected
4.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
If you board a train without tickets, the Indian Railways have ask you to get off the train.
If you board a train without tickets, the Indian Railways has ask you to get off the train.
If you board a train without tickets, the Indian Railways will ask you to get off the train.
If you board a train without tickets, the Indian Railways had ask you to get off the train.
Remember, the probable conditional takes the form ‘If + subordinate clause in present tense followed by main clause in future tense’
5.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
If you seeing him come through the front door, you may leave through the back door.
If you see him come through the front door, you may left through the back door.
If you see him come through the front door, you may leaves through the back door.
If you see him come through the front door, you may leave through the back door.
Remember, the probable conditional takes the form ‘If + subordinate clause in present tense followed by main clause in future tense.’ However, the main clause can also take a modal as in this case. The other options are grammatically wrong
6.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
I'll go house hunting if I have the time.
If I have the time, I'll go house hunting.
If I have the time I'll go house hunting.
Both options 1 and 2 are correct but option 3 is wrong.
Remember the form that probable conditionals take. We don't use the comma when we begin with the main clause and we do use the comma when we begin with the subordinate clause. Option 3 is missing its comma
7.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
Should inflation continue to rise, the RBI will increase the interest rates.
If inflation continues to rise, the RBI will increase the interest rates.
Should inflation continues to rise, the RBI will increase the interest rates.
Both options 1 and 2 are correct but option 3 is wrong.
Remember, the probable conditional takes the form ‘If + subordinate clause in present tense followed by main clause in future tense.’ However, in certain cases, as in option 1, we can use should instead of 'if' with a change in the verb. Note that option 3 is wrong because the verb has to change as we have used 'should'
8.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
If the downpour continues the match will be cancelled.
The match will be cancelled, if the downpour continues.
The downpour continues. The match will be cancelled.
If the downpour continues, the match will be cancelled.
Remember the form that probable conditionals take. We don't use the comma when we begin with the main clause and we do use the comma when we begin with the subordinate clause. In option 3 the sentences are separate and they are not connected
9.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
If you go out, remembering to bring milk.
If you go out, remembered to bring milk.
If you had gone out, remember to bring milk.
If you go out, remember to bring milk.
Remember, the probable conditional takes the form ‘If + subordinate clause in present tense followed by main clause in future tense.’ The other options use different tense forms
10.
Choose the correct probable conditional sentence from the following.
If you looking for the security person, you'll find him in the guard room.
If you are looking for the security person, you'll find him in the guard room.
If you are looking for the security person, you'll found him in the guard room.
If you had looking for the security person, you'll find him in the guard room.
Remember, the probable conditional takes the form ‘If + subordinate clause in present tense followed by main clause in future tense.’ However, the subordinate clause can also take a present continuous tense form as in this case. The other options are grammatically wrong
Author:  V T Narendra

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