IndiaIndia UKUKUSUS
Join Us
IndiaIndia UKUKUSUS
Grammar 46 - Nominalisation - Adjectives into Nouns 2
'Happiness' is the nominalised form of the adjective 'happy'.

Grammar 46 - Nominalisation - Adjectives into Nouns 2

In this, the third High English grammar quiz on nominalisation, as in the previous quiz we continue with the rules of grammar when nominalising adjectives into nouns.

We have seen how adjectives describe nouns. These are helpful in providing more information about the subject we are describing. If my friend has lots of wealth, probably, I would call him a rich friend. Here, we note that a friend is described as ‘rich’ and this provides much more information than just ‘friend.’ ‘Rich’ is an adjective. There are many other adjectives: 'friendly', 'happy', 'slim', 'old', 'rough', 'soft', not to mention all the colours, 'red', 'orange', 'yellow', 'green' 'blue', 'black', 'white', 'brown', 'purple' etc... All of these words we use to describe people, places or things are adjectives.

Adjectives are categorised into various types, such as adjectives of quantity and adjectives of comparison. We also have possessive adjectives and demonstrative adjectives. Sometimes, as we saw in the previous quiz, we can use some adjectives in a slightly different way by modifying them to become nouns. When we do this we are nominalising them.

Adjectives can be modified into nouns by adding suffixes just as we did with verbs. Sometimes more than one suffix can be added to the adjective. For instance, words such as ‘sensitive’ can be nominalised to form ‘sensitivity’ by adding the suffix ‘-ity’ with modifications or ‘sensitiveness’ by adding the suffix ‘-ness.’

We also have what are known as zero-derivation adjectives where the base form of the adjective is also used as a nominalised adjective to perform the functions of a noun. For instance, ‘destitute’ is an adjective and it can perform the functions of a noun, as in this sentence:

‘In the year 2013 the city had a large number of destitute children and in 2014 the number of destitutes went up significantly.’

Here the adjective ‘destitute’ is used as a noun in the latter part of the sentence. This aspect of adjectives is common with those that indicate a collective group. Words in this category include 'poor', 'blind' and 'deaf'. Of course, 'blind' and 'deaf' can also have 'blindness' and 'deafness' as the nominalised forms. Take this quiz and learn the rules of grammar to follow when nominalising adjectives into nouns.

1.
Choose the pair of adjectives that are NOT zero-derivation adjectives.
deaf, homeless
disabled, blind
rich, wealthy
able, formal
The nominalised form of 'able' is 'ability' and of 'formal' is 'formality.' The adjectives in the other options are zero-derivation adjectives, which can be used in their base form without adding a suffix. These are usually employed to indicate a collective group
2.
"The foundation of the mansion was strong. It could withstand the fury of the storm."
Combine the sentences by changing the adjective to a noun. Choose from the following.
The strength of the mansion's foundation enabled it to withstand the fury of the storm.
The strongness of the mansion's foundation enabled it to withstand the fury of the storm.
The strongance of the mansion's foundation enabled it to withstand the fury of the storm.
The strongity of the mansion's foundation enabled it to withstand the fury of the storm.
The nominalised form of 'strong' is 'strength' which is formed uniquely. The other options use the incorrect nominalised form of 'strong'
3.
"Your kindness is valuable to the entire village, and is felt by everyone."
Choose the sentence that uses the correct nominalised form of the adjective from the following.
The valueability of your kindness is felt by everyone in the village.
The value of your kindness is felt by everyone in the village.
The valueness of your kindness is felt by everyone in the village.
The valuement of your kindness is felt by everyone in the village.
The nominalised form of 'valuable' is 'value' which is formed uniquely. The other options all use the incorrect nominalised form of 'valuable'
4.
"My aunt was both generous and sensitive to my plight and bequeathed me her house."
Choose the sentence that uses the correct nominalised form of the adjectives from the following.
My aunt bequeathed her house to me, displaying her generous and sensitivity to my plight.
My aunt bequeathed her house to me, displaying her generosity and sensitive to my plight.
My aunt bequeathed her house to me, displaying her generousity and sensitivity to my plight.
My aunt bequeathed her house to me, displaying her generosity and sensitivity to my plight.
The nominalised form of 'generous' is 'generosity,' and that of 'sensitive' is 'sensitivity'. These are both formed by adding the suffix '-ity' with modifications. The other options use an incorrect nominalised form for one of the adjectives in each
5.
"My sister was cheerful. This made me forget all my troubles."
Combine the sentences by changing the adjective to a noun. Choose from the following.
My sister's cheerfulness made me forget all my troubles.
My sister's cheerfulity made me forget all my troubles.
My sister's cheerfulence made me forget all my troubles.
My sister's cheerfulness made me forgetful all my troubles.
The nominalised form of 'cheerful' is 'cheerfulness' which is formed by adding the suffix '-ness.' Options 2 and 3 use incorrect nominalised forms. Don't be fooled by option 4! Remember that 'forget' is a verb and 'forgetful' is an adjective
6.
"Arpana is happy to have Trupti with her. That is all that matters."
Combine the sentences by changing the adjective to a noun. Choose from the following.
Arpana's happyance to have Trupti with her is all that matters.
Arpana's happyment to have Trupti with her is all that matters.
Arpana's happiness to have Trupti with her is all that matters.
Arpana's happen to have Trupti with her is all that matters.
The nominalised form of 'happy' is 'happiness' which is formed by adding the suffix '-ness' with modifications. The other options all use the incorrect nominalised form of 'happy'
7.
"The golf course was difficult. Many golfers performed poorly."
Combine the sentences by changing the adjective to a noun. Choose from the following.
The golf course's difficultance resulted in a poor performance for many golfers.
The golf course's difficulty resulted in a poor performance for many golfers.
The golf course's difficultness resulted in a poor performance for many golfers.
The golf course was difficult so the performances of many golfers were poor.
The nominalised form of 'difficult' is 'difficulty' which is formed by adding the suffix '-y.' Options 1 and 3 use the incorrect nominalised form. In option 4 the verb 'performed' is nominalised
8.
"It is important for teenagers to be independent. This should not be underestimated."
Combine the sentences by changing the adjectives to nouns. Choose from the following.
The importance of independentance for teenagers should not be underestimated.
The importance of independently for teenagers should not be underestimated.
The importantly of independence for teenagers should not be underestimated.
The importance of independence for teenagers should not be underestimated.
The nominalised form of 'important' is 'importance', and that of 'independent' is 'independence', both of which are formed by adding the suffix '-nce' with modifications. The other options each use the incorrect nominalised form for one of the adjectives
9.
"Water is becoming scarce in many parts of the world, giving planners sleepless nights."
Choose the sentence that uses the correct nominalised form of the adjective from the following.
Scarcence of water in many parts of the world is giving planners sleepless nights.
Scarceth of water in many parts of the world is giving planners sleepless nights.
Scarciness of water in many parts of the world is giving planners sleepless nights.
Scarcity of water in many parts of the world is giving planners sleepless nights.
The nominalised form of 'scarce' is 'scarcity' which is formed by adding the suffix '-ity' with modifications. The other options all use the incorrect nominalised form of 'scarce'
10.
Choose the sentence with the adjective nominalised into a noun.
The minister announced increased job opportunities for the handicapped.
Juan Del Petro was handicapped by his injured wrist.
The handicapped player was no match for the fully fit opponent.
People were wonder struck by the grace of the handicapped child.
The nominalised form of 'handicapped' is 'handicapped' itself. This is a zero-derivation adjective which can be used in its base form without adding a suffix and this is usually employed to indicate a collective group. In option 2 'handicapped' is a verb. In options 3 and 4 'handicapped' is an adjective
Author:  V T Narendra

© Copyright 2016-2019 - Education Quizzes
TJS - Web Design Lincolnshire
View Printout in HTML

Valid HTML5

We use cookies to make your experience of our website better.

To comply with the new e-Privacy directive, we need to ask for your consent - I agree - No thanks - Find out more