IndiaIndia UKUKUSUS
Enjoyable and Effective Quizzes for Learning and Quick Revision
IndiaIndia UKUKUSUS
Grammar 49 - Modals - Expressing Attitudes
"He may be here at any moment." - 'May' is a modal verb.

Grammar 49 - Modals - Expressing Attitudes

In our day-to-day lives, we come across many situations and we need a variety of words to describe them. Since the main verb cannot describe certain aspects modals are used. This is the first of five High English grammar quizzes looking at modal verbs and it focusses in particular on modals that express attitudes.

Modal verbs, or simply modals, are helping verbs that support the function of a main verb. In a sentence, the modals cannot stand by themselves and always appear with a main verb. There are only a few modals that are used as helping verbs so it will be easy for you to familiarise yourself with them. Here is a list of the modals you will come across:

CAN
COULD
MAY
MIGHT
MUST
SHALL
SHOULD
WILL
WOULD

Expressing attitudes and describing functions are among the main uses of modals and each one has its own job defined by the rules of grammar. 'Can' is the modal used to describe ability or seek permission, as in the sentences ‘I can play the violin’ and ‘can I come with you?’

'May' is the modal used to seek permission or express possibility, as in the sentences ‘may I have a small piece of cake please?’ and ‘Mumbai Indians may win the IPL tournament.’

'Would' is the modal employed to request as in the sentence ‘would you please pass the sugar?’

'Must' is the modal used to advise as well as to describe a necessity, as in the sentences ‘you must consult a doctor for your fever’ and ‘you must get your driving licence renewed.’

'Shall' is the modal used to offer help or assistance, and to express something in the future, as in the sentences ‘shall I help you to cross the road?’ and 'I shall go to Australia for my holidays this year.'

'Will' is also used to express something in the future, as in the sentence ' I predict that England will win the World Cup next time around.'

In a sentence with modals, the main verb in its bare infinitive form follows a modal as seen in the sentences ‘she may come to the movie’ or ‘she must come to the movie.’ In addition, modals do not change in the third person. For instance, we write ‘they could strike’ and not ‘they coulds strike.’ Modals perform their role of helping the main verb communicate more. Take the grammar quiz that follows and see how many questions on modals expressing attitudes you can get right first time.

1.
Choose the sentence that is NOT a correct modal representation.
He must wear his seat belt while driving.
He musts wear his seat belt while driving.
He must weared his seat belt while driving.
Both options 2 and 3 above are not correct representations, but option 1 is.
Remember that the modal (must) is followed by the main verb (wear) in its bare infinitive form. Remember also that modals don't change form while using third person. Option 1 is a correct modal representation
2.
Choose the sentence that is a correct modal representation.
Roger Federer may win the Wimbledon title this year.
Andy Murray may not win the Wimbledon title this year.
John McEnroe dare not threaten the umpire.
All of the above are correct.
While options 1 and 2 are pure modals describing a possibility, option 3 is a sentence where 'dare' is a modal. Note that 'dare' is a main verb as well
3.
"She may visit her grandmother on the way to her office."
Choose the function described by the modal in the sentence.
Seeking permission.
Expressing possibility.
Giving advice.
Expressing ability.
The use of 'may' suggests a possibility. Note that it may be possible that she may not visit her grandmother also. However, the likelihood of visiting the grandmother is more because of the use of 'may.' If the sentence were to read 'She may not visit her grandmother on the way to her office' then the likelihood of not visiting is more because of the use of 'may not'
4.
"May I leave the office early?"
Choose the function described by the modal in the sentence.
Seeking permission.
Expressing ability
Offering assistance.
Giving advice.
It is obvious that the speaker is seeking permission
5.
"Simran has sprained her ankle, but still she can walk."
Choose the function described by the modal in the sentence.
Expressing necessity.
Expressing possibility.
Seeking permission.
Expressing ability.
The modal is indicating that, despite the sprained ankle, Simran is able to walk - showing her ability to do so
6.
Choose the sentence that is a correct modal representation.
Manav need not go to the school to pick up his son.
Manav mays go to the school to pick up his son.
Manav may goes to the school to pick up his son.
All three are incorrect modal representations.
Just like 'dare', 'need' is another modal that is a main verb also
7.
"The plumber was supposed to be here at 7 PM so he may come any moment now."
Identify the modal and the main verb in the sentence.
May, to be.
May, was.
May, come.
Supposed, come.
Remember in a sentence with modals, the main verb in its bare infinitive form (come) follows a modal (may)
8.
"The curry is bland. Would you please pass some salt?"
"You should not take any salt."
Choose the functions described by the modals in these sentences.
Expressing necessity - giving advice.
Making a request - expressing possibility.
Making a request - giving advice.
Seeking permission - expressing ability.
The sequence shows a request is made and some advice is rendered
9.
"Could I come to the birthday party with you?"
"Yes, you may."
Choose the functions described by the modals in these sentences.
Making a request - giving permission.
Making a request - giving advice.
Giving advice - seeking permission.
Offering assistance - expressing ability.
In the context of the two sentences, the first modal is in the form of a request and the second modal is in the nature of permission being granted
10.
"'You must go to your room and study,' roared the mother."
Choose the function described by the modal in the sentence.
Expressing ability.
Expressing necessity.
Expressing possibility.
Giving advice.
The word 'roared' makes it clear the mother says it is necessary for her son/daughter to study. If the phrase were said more gently then the mother might have been advising her child to study, rather than insisting upon it
Author:  V T Narendra

© Copyright 2016-2019 - Education Quizzes
TJS - Web Design Lincolnshire
View Printout in HTML

Valid HTML5

We use cookies to make your experience of our website better.

To comply with the new e-Privacy directive, we need to ask for your consent - I agree - No thanks - Find out more