Grade 3 Language - Adjectives and Adverbs 2
Her professor was the man who had the most influence on her future choice of career.

Grade 3 Language - Adjectives and Adverbs 2

This English Language quiz is called 'Adjectives and Adverbs 2' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at elementary school. Playing educational quizzes is an enjoyable way to learn if you are in the 3rd, 4th or 5th grade - aged 8 to 11.

It costs only $12.50 per month to play this quiz and over 3,500 others that help you with your school work. You can subscribe on the page at Join Us

Know your adjectives and get better grades in exams! In this quiz on adjectives, you are going to get some practice in using adjectives to compare things and ideas. There are three forms: the positive, comparative and superlative forms. What is the difference between these three forms? The positive is the base adjective, the comparative is more than the base and the superlative is the most. So let's take the word 'nice' as our example.

  • The positive is the word nice
  • The comparative is the word nicer
  • The superlative is the word nicest

Okay! Let's go! - and watch out for those irregular comparatives. As a tip, you might want to try our other Adjectives quizzes before you play this quiz.

1.
Complete the sentence with the correct form of the adverb.
Hurricanes destroy ____ of all the storms.
quicklier than
the quickliest
the most quickly
more quickly than
Since hurricanes are being compared to all types of storms, most quickly should be put into this blank.
2.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
Paul has two big trees in his back garden, but the oak tree is ____ the ash tree.
the more taller
the most tallest
taller than
tallest
One syllable adjectives form their comparative and superlative forms by adding -er and -est: you use the -er form and 'than' when you are comparing two objects or ideas, but you MUST use 'the' and the -est form when you are comparing more than two objects or ideas. For example: 'This tree is taller than my neighbor's tree' (two trees compared). 'This is the tallest tree in the forest' (one tree compared with all the other trees in the forest, which number two or more).
3.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
In his latest album, the rock star wrote ____ songs he has ever written.
the best
the goodest
the better
the bestest
This sentence requires the superlative form of the adjective because you are comparing the songs on this album (one album of songs) with all the other songs that he has ever written. Unfortunately, you can't say 'the goodest' because good has an irregular form: good-better-best. Another important adjective that falls into this category is 'bad-worse-worst'. The form of the adjective that doesn't change is called the 'positive' form: good, bad, beautiful and so on.
4.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
The Missouri river is ____ river in the USA, but the river Nile is ____ it.
the longest, longer than
the longest, longest than
the long, longer than
the longer, the longer than
Superlative for the Missouri - yes! it's not the Mississippi - because you are comparing one river with all the other rivers in the USA. Comparative for the Nile because you are comparing it with only one other river - the Missouri. Don't forget: one syllable adjectives form their comparative forms by adding -er and -est: you use the -er form and 'than' when you are comparing two objects or ideas, but you MUST use 'the' and the -est form when you are comparing more than two objects or ideas.
5.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adverbs.
Cheetahs may run ____ than horses, but the horses run ____ across a field of every animal.
the most swiftly, more beautifully
swiftly, more beautifully
the swiftlitest, the beautifullier
more swiftly, the most beautifully
Cheetahs and horses are being compared in the first part of a sentence and horses are being compared to all of the other animals in the last part of the sentence.
6.
Complete the sentence with the correct form of the adverb.
Sally spoke ____ to her teacher than Billy.
politeliest
politelier
most politely
more politely
Sally and Billy are being compared, so more politely should be used in the sentence.
7.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adverbs.
Lines were drawn ____ on the yellow paper than the blue paper, but the lines on the yellow paper had been drawn ____ of any lines.
the most evenly, more quickly
evenliest, quicklier
more evenly, the most quickly
evenlier, quickliest
The lines on the yellow and blue papers are compared in the first part of the sentence and the lines on the yellow paper are being compared to all the other lines in the last part of the sentence.
8.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
Dave would like a ____ sugar in his tea; Peter would like ____ sugar than Dave, and Bill would like ____ sugar of all.
little, less, the least
little, least, less
less, little, least
least, less, little
'Less' has an irregular form: 'little-less-least'. Dave is simply stating how much sugar he wants, so the adjective remains in the positive form - unchanged. Peter is stating how much sugar he wants in comparison to Dave, so the adjective goes into the comparative. Finally, Bill is stating how much sugar he wants in comparison to the other two people, so the adjective goes into the superlative.
9.
Complete the sentence with the correct form of the adverb.
The sun shone ____ today of any day this past week.
warmliest
the most warmly
more warmly
warmlier
Today’s sun is being compared to all of the days of the past week.
10.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
The kitten is ____ than the puppy.
playfuler
more playful
the playfuler
playerful
Be on the look out for adjectives that end in -ful and -less: 'useful/useless', 'careful/careless', 'harmful/harmless', 'homeless' (there is NO 'homeful'), and so on. Only two things are being compared, so you need the comparative: more playful. The superlative would be the most playful.
Author:  Amy Flanders

© Copyright 2016-2019 - Education Quizzes
TJS - Web Design Lincolnshire
View Printout in HTML

Valid HTML5

We use cookies to make your experience of our website better.

To comply with the new e-Privacy directive, we need to ask for your consent - I agree - No thanks - Find out more