Grade 4 Language - Metaphors and Similes 2
Life is like a box of chocolates.

Grade 4 Language - Metaphors and Similes 2

This English Language quiz is called 'Metaphors and Similes 2' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at elementary school. Playing educational quizzes is an enjoyable way to learn if you are in the 3rd, 4th or 5th grade - aged 8 to 11.

It costs only $12.50 per month to play this quiz and over 3,500 others that help you with your school work. You can subscribe on the page at Join Us

Similes are comparing words. 'As nutty as a fruitcake' and 'Life is like a box of chocolates' are similes: an expression used to describe the quality of someone or something by comparing it with something else: often, the meaning of the simile has to be worked out. Similes are easily recognized because they use 'like' or 'as ... as ...'.

So, if 'Life is like a box of chocolates', what is life like? If you've seen the film 'Forrest Gump', you'll probably know the answer. Incidentally, this simile first appeared in the 1994 film 'Forrest Gump'.

Similes can brighten up any piece of writing ~ even more so if the simile is humorous ~ add some to your writing and see if you get extra marks from your English teacher!

Do this elementary school quiz and see if you can work out what some similes and metaphors really mean.

1.
Choose the best explanation for the simile.
Sheila is as snug as a bug in a rug in her new house.
Sheila feels cramped in her new house
Sheila is warm and comfortable in her new house
Sheila lives in a rug
Sheila has a lot of bugs in her rugs
Has anyone asked the bugs how they feel?
2.
Choose the best explanation for the simile.
She's as blind as a bat.
She can't see very well
She thinks she's a bat
She uses echolocation to see
She has perfect vision
This could also mean that she doesn't want to accept things that she should, for example: She's as blind as a bat when it comes to her son's misbehavior
3.
Choose the best explanation for the simile.
Dave is as mad as a hornet.
Dave is a little mad in the head
Dave is very mad in the head
Dave is not very angry
Dave is very angry
If you were to disturb a hornets' nest, you'd soon find out the meaning of this simile: don't do it!
4.
Choose the best explanation for the simile.
Peter is as quiet as a church mouse.
Peter makes a scratching noise
Peter lives a quiet life in a church
Peter goes to church quietly
Peter is very quiet
Is a church mouse quieter than a town mouse?
5.
What is the meaning of the metaphor in the sentence?
After the classroom had a substitute in it for weeks, the classroom was a zoo.
The kids in the classroom are acting wild
There are a few animals in the classroom
The kids are going to take a field trip to the zoo
The classroom is very quiet
When someone says that the classroom is a zoo, then the kids are misbehaving
6.
Choose the best explanation for the simile.
His shoes fit like a glove.
He wears gloves on his feet
His gloves fit very well
His shoes fit very well
He wears shoes on his hands
If it fits like a glove, you can wear it
7.
Choose the best explanation for the simile.
Mike eats like a pig.
Mike eats a lot, or he eats noisily and unpleasantly
Mike lives on a farm
Mike eats out of a pig trough
Mike eats nicely
Poor pigs!
8.
What is the meaning of the metaphor in the sentence?
The student was a shining star and won many school awards.
The student put a star on the board
The student is the best in the class
The student is very shiny
The student has a star on his shirt
This student would be the best student if he was called a shining star
9.
What is the meaning of the metaphor in the sentence?
Since it snowed for four days in a row, my house became a prison for me.
The house is near a prison
There are a lot of people in the house
There are bars on the windows of his or her house
The person has stayed for a long time in his or her house
Since the house is being compared to a prison, it means that the person is ready to get out of his or her house
10.
Choose the best explanation for the simile.
The teacher's explanation was as clear as mud.
The teacher's explanation was very clear
The teacher's explanation was not at all clear
The teacher's explanation was quite clear
The teacher's explanation was covered in mud
This simile is often used ironically or sarcastically: Oh, yes! I understood everything; his explanation was as clear as mud
Author:  Amy Flanders

© Copyright 2016-2019 - Education Quizzes
TJS - Web Design Lincolnshire
View Printout in HTML

Valid HTML5

We use cookies to make your experience of our website better.

To comply with the new e-Privacy directive, we need to ask for your consent - I agree - No thanks - Find out more