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Lincolnshire Free Days Out

    • Anderby Creek Beach

      Anderby Creek is a lovely rural area that is well-known for being one of the last unspoilt places on the Lincolnshire coast. The area is subject to planning restrictions that prevent night clubs and amusement arcades and as such it retains its reputation as an ideal destination for a quiet day out.

      Website
      Anderby Creek Beach

    • Ayscoughfee Hall - Spalding

      This impressive building was originally the home of a wealthy local wool merchant but in 2006 it was converted to a museum and immediately won the title of Lincolnshire Museum of the Year. The exterior appearance has changed little and it might still be recognised by someone from the 15th century! Ayschoughfee Hall is surrounded by extremely well-kept gardens in which tennis, putting and bowls are all enjoyed in lovely settings. There is also a popular café.

      Website
      Ayscoughfee Hall

    • Baysgarth House Museum - Barton-upon-Humber

      Formerly home to the Wright-Taylor family, Baysgarth House Museum is located in the historic market town of Barton-upon-Humber and is surrounded by 30 acres of beautiful parkland. The museum focuses on the history and lives of people in the local area. A team of dedicated volunteers are usually on hand to point out delights including a large collection of 18th and 19th century porcelain and pottery.

      Website
      Baysgarth House Museum

    • Bolingbroke Castle

      The ruins of Bolingbroke Castle are maintained by Heritage Lincolnshire. The castle was built in around 1225 by the earl of Chester (and earl of Lincoln from 1217) and although long in ruins you can still see the lower walls and the ground floor towers. Each summer the castle hosts a number of events including performances of Shakespeare.

      Website
      Bolingbroke Castle

    • Boston Stump

      This is the largest parish church in Britain. St Botolph's Church, more commonly known now as "Boston Stump" is approximately 272 feet high and can be seen for miles around because of the flat countryside around it. On a clear day, it can be seen from East Anglia, on the other side of The Wash. The nickname given to the church (Boston Stump) is often used affectionately as a reference to the whole building. The name "Boston" which is now given to the entire town evolved from "Botolph's Town".

      Website
      Boston Stump

    • Bourne Heritage Centre

      The ancient Baldocks Mill is now used as Bourne's Heritage centre and is the only remaining mill building in Bourne. There are 3 different floors each with its own individual flavour… On the ground floor you can see agricultural implements and the new mill wheel. The middle floor is the Raymond Mays Exhibition Room and records the success of BRM and ERA throughout their history whilst the top floor has exhibits relating to local history. The Heritage Centre is usually only open during weekend afternoons.

      Website
      Bourne Heritage Centre

    • Bourne Woods

      Bourne Woods is an ancient, large area of woodland. There are plenty of walkways situated inside the woods, making it people friendly. Some walks lead to ponds where you can often find kingfishers and herons. The area is a favourite place for walking your pets. There is a car park and a picnic area making it the perfect place to take your family, including your pet!

      Website
      Bourne Woods

    • Bransby Horses Rescue and Welfare

      This is a haven for animal lovers. Bransby Horses Rescue and Welfareis staffed by people who care dearly for horses, and do everything in their power to make sure that they are treated properly. The business is currently homing around 400 horses on over 600 acres of land. Bransby has a visitor centre, which gives people the chance to have a guided tour and meet some of the rescued residents as well as the lovely people who work there.

      Website
      Bransby Horses Rescue and Welfare

    • Brumby Wood

      Brumby woods is a nature reserve which has mixed, ancient part-natural woodland. The woodland provides an important link between residential areas and encompasses a variety of habitats. There are extensive walks throughout the area on which the public are always welcome. The “Ridge Walk” is well worthy of consideration for a quiet stroll. One of the objectives of the site is to involve local people in conservation projects.

      Website
      Brumby Wood

    • Chambers Farm Wood - Wragby

      Chambers Farm Nature Reserve is an excellent place for anyone who likes to get in touch with nature. The site is located on a medieval woodland and is renowned for its insect life – particularly butterflies. The wood is the home to a colony of rare Barbastrelle bats. There's always plenty to see in the woods and it’s worthwhile keeping an eye on the website for up to date information.

      Website
      Chambers Farm Wood

    • Cleethorpes Beach

      Cleethorpes is home to one of the UK's best beaches. From October to Easter, the entire beach is dog friendly, making it entertaining for the family and the dogs! The beach has been awarded a Blue Flag for its cleanliness. It is close to a theme park, and has been described as a "Bird watchers paradise".

      Website
      Cleethorpes Beach

    • Dock Tower - Grimsby

      Local “Grimarians” often tell gullible visitors that the Dock Tower stands on a foundation of cotton wool – don’t believe a word of it! The purpose of the tower was to provide hydraulic power. 30,000 gallons of water held at a great height within the tower produced a pressure of 100lb per square inch and this tremendous pressure was used to open and close 10 pairs of lock gates along with the gates of a railway crossing.

      Website
      Dock Tower

    • Fenscape - Spalding

      "Fenscape" is a display within the Springfields Shopping complex on the outskirts of Spalding. It is designed as an interactive way of learning about the fens in Lincolnshire. Using audio, interpretive sculptures and graphic panels, Fenscape teaches you about the people that were involved in shaping the fens, and how future changes will affect it.

      Website
      Fenscape

    • Frodingham Railway Cutting

      Frodingham is a nature reserve consisting of wet wildflower meadows that are particularly noted for their flowering plants. There is no better place to see common spotted orchids growing in the wild. It is also home to numerous insects, birds and reptiles. The reserve has a visitor friendly attitude and has footpaths, board works, information boards, and a pond dipping facility.

      Website
      Frodingham Railway Cutting

    • Golding Young and Mawer Auctioneers - Grantham

      This business was formed by the merger of two well established auction houses (Golding Young and Thomas Mawer) in 2010. The business has offices in Bourne, Stamford, Lincoln and Grantham and is well known for its expertise in selling fine art, jewellery and many collectables. See the website for details of future sales.

      Website
      Golding Young

    • Guildhall - Boston

      Boston's St Mary's Guildhall was built in 1390 and is one only a few medieval buildings which has survived in Boston from that era. It's now the town museum and you can discover stories from nearly every period since the time when Boston first existed.

      Website
      St Mary's Guildhall

    • Immingham Museum

      The main theme of this museum is the story of Immingham Docks and its involvement in the Great Central Railway. Amongst the exhibits you will find some rare treasures on loan from the National Railway Museum. In addition there is a display featuring an old grocers and chemist shop along with a celebration of the story of the Pilgrim Fathers. The museum is proud to have been a totally voluntary organisation since 2003.

      Website
      Immingham Museum

    • Lincolnshire Wolds

      Lincolnshire Wolds is a designated area of outstanding natural beauty. The Lincolnshire Wolds is home to "Wolds top" which at 551 feet is the highest point in the entire county. As well as many miles of beautiful walks you will also find delights such as the Red Hill Nature Reserve and Cadwell Park Motor Racing Circuit.

      Website
      Lincolnshire Wolds

    • Lollycocks Field - Sleaford

      Lollycocks Field is a nature reserve near Sleaford. The area is very visitor-friendly and has surfaced footpaths, walkways and boardwalks which give access to the pond for wheelchairs and pushchairs. There are many information points dotted around the site, so that you can learn as you walk around and enjoy the surroundings.

      Website
      Lolycocks Field

    • Maplethorpe Beach

      Maplethorpe has a wonderful beach where the whole family can have great fun and enjoy the wide open spaces and the sea. One of the features of the beach is "The Sand Train" which runs from one end of the beach to the other – it’s a long walk without it!

      Website
      Maplethorpe Beach

    • Mount Pleasant Windmill - Kirton-in-Lindsey

      Mount Pleasant Mill was built in 1875 for Edric Landsall and his initials can still be seen above the lintel at the loading back door. The mill has recently been restored to its former glory and is again grinding. There is a pleasant tea-room and you have the opportunity to buy 10 different kinds of pure Stoneground Organic Flours.

      Website
      Mount Pleasant Mill

    • Museum of Lincolnshire Life - Lincoln

      The Museum of Lincolnshire Life has many interesting displays and offers hours of fun for all the family. The museum reflects the life and culture of people in Lincolnshire from 1750 to the present day. The museum's galleries of the Royal Lincolnshire Regiment (which includes the famous World War One tank, "Flirt") have won several prestigious awards.

      Website
      Museum of Lincolnshire Life

    • Nationial Cycle Network

      Throughout the country, all our towns and cities are connected by the National Cycle Network. This is managed by an organization called "Sustrans" with the intention of helping people think more about their choices of travel. They hope that by 2020 four out of five local journeys will be made by cycle, foot, or public transport. Keen cyclists will find that the absence of hills in Lincolnshire makes for easy-going! A good place to start might be the lovely stretch of countryside between Gainsborough and Scotter - approximately 20 miles long and part of this cycle network.

      Website
      National Cycle Network

    • North Lincolnshire Museum - Scunthorpe

      The North Lincolnshire Museum is run by North Lincolnshire Council and is billed as “A great day out for all the family”. In 2013 the museum was shortlisted for the award of Telegraph Family Friendly Museum. Children have a chance to see how much the area has changed over the years and to participate in many interactive exhibits.

      Website
      North Lincolnshire Museum

    • Parish Church - Coningsby

      Coningsby Parish Church is noted for its very unusual clock… The clock face is painted directly onto the wall of the tower and is over 16 feet in diameter. It has large stones as its driving weights and the pendulum swings every TWO seconds. If all that were not enough, the clock has only one hand!

      Website
      Coningsby Parish Church

    • RAF Heritage Centre - Scampton

      Please note that the RAF Heritage Centre offers free admission but it is necessary to book your visit in advance. This is the famous bomber base from which the Dambusters flew their legendary raid in May 1943. Nowadays the base is home to the Red Arrows display team. Walk around the model of a Thor nuclear missile and see the collection of ejection seats and modern helmets. If you are really lucky you might get a glimpse of “The Reds”!

      Website
      RAF Heritage Centre

    • Robet Bell Auctions - Woodhall Spa

      Robert Bell is one of the longest established, busiest auction houses in Lincolnshire and can trace its history back to the 18th Century. There are regular sales of furniture and antiques and the company also conduct on-site farm dispersal sales. The website gives details of all upcoming sales. Auctions are always entertaining events – particularly when you get a lively auctioneer!

      Website
      Robert Bell Auctions

    • Sawcliffe - Scunthorpe

      The site of Sawcliffe was bought from the "British Steel" company back in 1996 and covers about 14 hectares of land. The nature reserve includes a wide variety of plants such as Birch, Ash and Hazel; the animal inhabitants include Red deer, Fox's and Pheasants. There are excellent views over the town as well as lakes on nearby land.

      Website
      Sawcliffe

    • Saxilby History Trail

      The villagers of Saxilby have created this History Trail so that visitors can learn a little about their lovely village. Twenty plaques around the village show photographs dating back to the early 20th century. You can pick up a leaflet about the project at the Tourist Information Centre in Lincoln or in the village itself at the post office, pubs and cafes.

      Website
      Saxilby History Trail

    • Seal Colony - Donna Nook

      This is one of many nature reserves managed by the Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust (LWT). The reserve includes 10 km (6.25 miles) of coastline that at certain times of the year is home to thousands of seals. The most popular time to visit is during November and December when the seals of Donna Nook are giving birth to their pups. The area attracts most visitors during this winter period but the wild seascape, dunes and mudflaps are interesting at any time of the year.

      Website
      Donna Nook Seal Colony

    • Skegness Beach and Pier

      The award winning beaches of Skegness ensure that the town remains a favourite holiday destination for thousands of people throughout Lincolnshire and beyond. The pier has stood the test of storms and raging seas for over 130 years since it was built in 1880. Although not as long as it was originally, the pier is still large enough to house ten pin bowling, amusements and “Captain Kids Adventure World”.

      Website
      Skegness Beach and Pier

    • Snipe Dales Country Park - Lusby

      This large country park provides varied habitats and is rich in wildlife. The coniferous trees in the wooden areas are gradually being replaced by deciduous species and in the Spring these woods are alive with birdsong. A multitude of small birds includes treecreeper, goldcrest, finches (various species) wren, long-tailed tit and greater spotted woodpecker and this abundance of “ready meals” ensures that sparrowhawks and kestrels are never far away! The wet valleys, grassland and scrub land provide living quarters for mice and voles which in turn attract Tawny owls and Barn Owls. The area known as Furze Hill is a paradise for many different species of butterfly.

      Website
      Snipe Dales Country Park

    • Spalding Auction

      Spalding auction is an established produce auction that is well known throughout England as a major horticultural centre. It is probably the largest auction of its type in the country. Auctions of flowers, pot plants and vegetables take place every Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. A visit makes an interesting outing and is a great way to introduce youngsters to the hustle and bustle of auction life.

      Website
      Spalding Auction

    • St Wulfram's Church - Grantham

      St Wulfram's is the parish church of Grantham and one of the largest medieval churches in England - it can seat approximately 700 people. This beautiful building has a 14th century crypt and visitors are also welcome to take a look at the chained library. Stewards are usually on hand to provide a helpful audio tour.

      Website
      St Wulfram's Church

    • Tattershall College

      Tattershall College is the remains of a grammar school that was founded for church choristers in the mid-15th century. The college was built by Lord Cromwell, who was the builder of nearby Tattershall Castle. Please note that the College area is managed by English Heritage and is free to visit but the Castle requires an entrance fee.

      Website
      Tattershall College

    • The Bowthorpe Oak - Bourne

      This is probably the oldest oak tree in England with an estimated age of over 1,000 years. The tree has been the subject of a short TV documentary and has an entry in the Guinness Book of Records. Visitors are welcome to view the tree at Bowthorpe Park Farm.

      Website
      Bowthorpe Oak

    • The Collection Museum - Lincoln

      This award winning archaeology-based museum specialises in discoveries from around the local county. The Collection is also one of the regions premier art galleries. The museum certainly lives up to its name and has quite a "collection" including historical artefacts found from the stone ages, all the way up to the English Civil War. The museum has an activity room providing plenty for children to do, as well as a cafe.

      Website
      The Collection Museum

    • The National Centre for Craft and Design - Sleaford

      The small town of Sleaford is home to the largest venue in the country that is specifically devoted to contemporary and international art and design. The centre enjoys a beautiful riverside setting and the exhibits within its walls are forever changing. At one time you will find the gallery spaces filled with work

      Website
      The National Centre for Craft and Design

    • The Ropewalk - Barton-upon-Humber

      "The Ropewalk" was once the longest tiled structure in Europe (a third of a mile long) and was used for the purpose of making ropes for the royal navy, deep sea fishing fleets and even the accent of Mount Everest. The area is now a regionally acclaimed arts centre with four gallery spaces. Roperly Hall within the complex is a small venue used for live music, theatre, comedy and film.

      Website

      http://www.ropewalkmuseum.co.uk/

    • Trinity Bridge - Crowland

      Trinity Bridge is one of only a handful in the world that no longer spans a physical obstacle. It was built in the late 1300s as the cheapest solution for spanning the body water where two rivers converged. Later, when the river Welland was diverted around Crowland, the bridge was left high and dry.

      Website
      Trinity Bridge

    • Trolleybus Museum - Sandtoft

      The Trolleybus museum occupies the area which was formerly RAF Sandtoft. Volunteers have transformed the broken landscape into a museum dedicated to Trolleybuses. The museum has the largest collection of preserved trolleybuses in Europe and possibly the world! As well as buses, you will also find exhibits on many aspects of English heritage including GR lamp boxes, stamp machines, and old telephone boxes.

      Website
      Trolleybus Museum

    • Waters' Edge Country Park - Barton-upon-Humber

      Waters’ Edge Country Park affords fine views of the Humber Bridge - over 2 kilometres long and amongst the largest single-span suspension bridges in the world. The visitor centre is managed by the North Lincolnshire Council and has a number of attractions. You will find interactive displays in the visitor centre, a gift shop, café and a number of walks through the adjoining nature reserve.

      Website
      Waters' Edge Country Park

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