Appositives versus Adjectives
Susan, my brother’s girlfriend, is a good gymnast.

Appositives versus Adjectives

This English Language quiz is called 'Appositives versus Adjectives' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

It costs only $12.50 per month to play this quiz and over 3,500 others that help you with your school work. You can subscribe on the page at Join Us

Appositives and adjectives are phrases or words which describe. In language, every word used has a purpose, meaning and place. One of those types of words that you have learned about is the adjective. An adjective is a word that describes, identifies or further defines a noun or a pronoun. In short, it is a “describing” word.

Let’s look at the following sentence: “The truck is blue.” In this sentence we know that the “truck” is a common noun. What can we learn about the truck in this sentence? We learn that it is “blue”. “Blue” is an adjective as it describes the truck.

Now let’s learn about an appositive. An appositive is a phrase that describes, identifies or further defines a noun or a pronoun. Now, that sounds rather familiar doesn’t it? There is, however, a difference. Remember, an adjective is a word whereas an appositive is a phrase. In the sentence above we learned that the truck was blue. Now let’s look at the truck using an appositive.

The truck, which was purchased at Rocky’s Auto Outlet, is blue.

The adjective told us that the truck is “blue” but the appositive told us “which was purchased at Rocky’s Auto Outlet.” This is a phrase that gives us further information about the noun “truck.” Appositives are generally found between two commas, one at the beginning of the phrase and one at the end unless the appositive begins the sentence or ends the sentence.

For each sentence below, determine if the appositive begins the sentence, is in the middle of the sentence or ends the sentence or determine if the sentence contains a simple adjective.
1.
My neighbor, James put in a swimming pool.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
The main sentence here is “James put in a swimming pool.” The first part of the sentence further defines the noun “James” by letting us know he is “my neighbor.” This portion of the sentence is an appositive phrase. Answer (a) shows the correct placement of this appositive phrase.
2.
A beautiful garden across the street, it is the result of my friend’s dedication and green thumb.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
The main sentence here is “It is the result of my friend’s dedication and green thumb.” The first part of the sentence further defines the pronoun “it” by letting us know it is “a beautiful garden across the street.” This portion of the sentence is an appositive phrase. Answer (a) shows the correct placement of this appositive phrase.
3.
Some people refer to flashy Las Vegas as sin city.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
This appears to be a simple sentence that does not contain an appositive phrase. It does contain a proper noun (Las Vegas) that is further defined by an adjective (flashy). As such, this sentence contains a simple adjective and Answer (d) is correct.
4.
I loaned my car to George, who is a friend of my parents.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
The main sentence here is “I loaned my car to George.” The second part of the sentence further defines the noun “George” by letting us know who he is, i.e., “a friend of my parents.” This portion of the sentence is an appositive phrase. Answer (c) shows the correct placement of this appositive phrase.
5.
Gordon was excited to have been accepted at Harvard University, his father’s alma mater.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
The main sentence here is “Gordon was excited to have been accepted at Harvard University.” The second part of the sentence further defines the proper noun “Harvard University” by letting us know what it is, i.e., “his father’s alma mater.” This portion of the sentence is an appositive phrase. Answer (c) shows the correct placement of this appositive phrase.
6.
Susan, my brother’s girlfriend, is a good gymnast.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
The main sentence here is “Susan is a good gymnast.” The middle part of the sentence further defines “Susan” by letting us know she is “my brother’s girlfriend.” This portion of the sentence is an appositive phrase. Answer (b) shows the correct placement of this appositive phrase.
7.
Amanda’s behavior is very different than Adam, her estranged brother.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
The main sentence here is “Amanda’s behavior is very different than Adam.” The second part of the sentence further defines the noun “Adam” by letting us know who he is, i.e., “her estranged brother.” This portion of the sentence is an appositive phrase. Answer (c) shows the correct placement of this appositive phrase.
8.
My wife, who is a lawyer, has to appear in court tomorrow morning.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
The main sentence here is “My wife has to appear in court tomorrow morning.” The middle part of the sentence further defines “my wife” by letting us know she is “a lawyer.” This portion of the sentence is an appositive phrase. Answer (b) shows the correct placement of this appositive phrase.
9.
Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is known to be heavily populated with Mormons.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
The main sentence here is “Salt Lake City is known to be heavily populated with Mormons.” The middle part of the sentence further defines the proper noun “Salt Lake City” by letting us know it is “the capital of Utah.” This portion of the sentence is an appositive phrase. Answer (b) shows the correct placement of this appositive phrase.
10.
Ryland High School has the best teachers in the county.
Begins the sentence
Is in the middle of the sentence
Ends the sentence
Contains a simple adjective
This appears to be a simple sentence that does not contain an appositive phrase. It does contain a noun (teachers) that is further defined by an adjective (best). As such, this sentence contains a simple adjective and Answer (d) is correct.
Author:  Christine G. Broome

© Copyright 2016-2019 - Education Quizzes
TJS - Web Design Lincolnshire
View Printout in HTML

Valid HTML5

We use cookies to make your experience of our website better.

To comply with the new e-Privacy directive, we need to ask for your consent - I agree - No thanks - Find out more