Pronouns - Nominative and Objective
Dad fixed them a pizza.

Pronouns - Nominative and Objective

This English Language quiz is called 'Pronouns - Nominative and Objective' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

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By now you should be aware that a pronoun is a word that replaces one or more nouns in a sentence. For example: “Martha’s family is coming soon.” can be reworded using a pronoun so that it will then read, “Her family is coming soon.” In this case “her” is a personal pronoun.

Personal pronouns have three cases. These include: nominative, objective and possessive. The manner in which the pronoun is used in a sentence will determine which case it belongs to. For this quiz we will focus on nominative case pronouns and objective case pronouns.

Nominative Case Pronoun: A nominative case pronoun is when the pronoun is used as the subject in a sentence. Nominative case pronouns include: I, you, she, he, they, we and it. An example of a nominative case pronoun would be: She ate the cookie. “She” is the subject of this sentence.

As you may remember, a simple sentence is composed of three parts: the subject - the verb - the object. “She” is the subject, “ate” is the verb and “cookie” is the object.

Objective Case Pronoun: An objective case pronoun is when the pronouns me, you, him, us, it, her and them are used as a direct object, indirect object or an object of a preposition.

An example of a pronoun used as a direct object would be: “Our collie likes her.” In this sentence, the collie is the subject, likes is the verb and “her” is the direct object.

An example of an indirect object would be: “Theresa cooked us a huge dinner.” In this sentence, Theresa is the subject, cooked is the verb and dinner is the object. The word “us” is an indirect object included within the sentence because it can be removed and the sentence would still be a complete, intact sentence.

Finally, an example of an object of a preposition would be: “Tommy can ride with you.” In this sentence, Tommy is the subject and ride is the verb. It can stand alone as a sentence, however, to give the sentence more detail, a preposition (with) is added along with an object “you” making the sentence a more complete sentence and since “you” is the object of “with”, it is an objective case pronoun.

For each sentence below, determine whether the pronoun is a nominative case pronoun, objective case pronoun - direct object, an objective case pronoun - indirect object or an objective case pronoun - object of a preposition.

1.
Mr. Stanton drove to Washington, D.C. with THEM.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
When a pronoun, such as me, you, him, us, it, her and them, is used as an object of a preposition, it is an objective case pronoun. In this sentence, “them” comes after the preposition “with” so it is an object of “with”. As such, Answer (d) objective case pronoun - object of a preposition is the correct pronoun case
2.
The new boy smiled at HER.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
As "her" comes after "at" (a preposition), "her" is the direct object (object pronoun) of a preposition. Therefore, Answer (d) objective case pronoun - object of a preposition is the correct pronoun case
3.
The babysitter watched ME.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
In this sentence, the “babysitter” is the subject, “watched” is the verb and “me” is the direct object. The Answer (b) objective case pronoun - direct object is the correct pronoun case
4.
The Principal gave HIM an award.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
In this sentence, “Principal” is the subject, “gave” is the verb and “award” is the object. The sentence would be a complete sentence on its own if it were written, “The Principal gave an award.” The pronoun “him” is an indirect object. This tells us that the correct answer is Answer (c) - objective case pronoun - indirect object
5.
Jennifer and I went to the movies.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
When a pronoun is used as a subject of a sentence it is referred to as a nominative case pronoun. In this sentence “I” is one of the subjects as “went” is the verb and “movies” is the object. Therefore, Answer (a) nominative case pronoun is the correct pronoun case
6.
HE will raise the flag during the ceremony.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
When a pronoun is used as a subject of a sentence it is referred to as a nominative case pronoun. In this sentence “He” is the subject, “will raise” is the verb and “flag” is the direct object with ceremony also being an object but cannot stand on its own, i.e., it would not be a complete sentence if written, “He will raise during the ceremony.” Therefore, Answer (a) nominative case pronoun is the correct pronoun case
7.
THEY have a broken sled.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
When a pronoun is used as a subject of a sentence it is referred to as a nominative case pronoun. In this sentence “They” is the subject, “have” is the verb and “sled” is the object. Therefore, Answer (a) nominative case pronoun is the correct pronoun case
8.
Lilly will study with Casey and YOU.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
When a pronoun, such as me, you, him, us, it, her and them, is used as an object of a preposition, it is an objective case pronoun. In this sentence, “you” comes after the preposition “and” so it is an object of “and”. As such, Answer (d) objective case pronoun - object of a preposition is the correct pronoun case
9.
Grandpa took THEM to the circus.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
In this sentence, the “Grandpa” is the subject, “took” is the verb and “them” is the direct object. The word “circus” is also an object but the sentence could not be a complete sentence if it was written “Grandpa took to the circus.” As such, “them” is a necessary object needed for this sentence and shows that Answer (b) objective case pronoun - direct object is the correct pronoun case
10.
Dad fixed THEM a pizza.
nominative case pronoun
objective case pronoun - direct object
objective case pronoun - indirect object
objective case pronoun - object of a preposition
In this sentence, “Dad” is the subject, “fixed” is the verb and “pizza” is the object. The sentence would be a complete sentence on its own if it were written, “Dad fixed a pizza.” The pronoun “them” is an indirect object. This tells us that the correct answer is Answer (c) objective case pronoun - indirect object
Author:  Christine G. Broome

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