Reading Comprehension - Review of Parts of a Story
Abigail had been dancing nearly all of her life and her body showed it.

Reading Comprehension - Review of Parts of a Story

This English Language quiz is called 'Reading Comprehension - Review of Parts of a Story' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

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You will have learned that a story is made up of five basic parts. Those parts include a plot, the characters, a conflict or several conflicts, a central theme and a setting. No story can be told successfully if there isn’t a plot. It is the entire series of events that tell the story from beginning to end. Without a plot, all you have is a series of sentences strung together.

As you will be called upon to begin doing a lot more reading and writing, this quiz will give you the opportunity to review the parts of a story.

It is important to really understand each part and its importance. Knowing and understanding those parts will help you when it comes time to write book reports, as book reports pull from each part. It will also help you to develop your own writing skills as you understand what you need to include in your writing to make it a successful piece of work. Repetition makes perfect so here again is a brief overview of the parts of a story.

PLOT and COUNTERPARTS

The plot, as you may recall, is divided into counterparts. The first counterpart is the exposition. In the exposition the leading characters will be introduced, along with some secondary characters. Part of what the writer needs to do in this section is to give the readers a feel for each of the characters, their personalities, their past experiences and, perhaps, a hint as to what their role will be in resolving the conflict of the story.

The second counterpart is known as the rising action and this is the point in the story where the conflict (or conflicts) will be set up. Often the reader sees the conflict before the main characters see what they are heading for. Then, as the story plays out, you have the third counterpart which is a climax or the turning point of the story where the character(s) and conflict(s) reach their pique. At this point, the character(s) usually changes, generally becoming stronger than before due to the conflict(s).

The fourth counterpart is that of the falling action. In this stage all of the loose ends of the story are tied up and resolved (unless the story will have a sequel). Finally, the fifth counterpart is the resolution or the closing paragraphs of the story that gives the readers satisfaction and, in the case of a sequel, leads the readers to want to continue on to the next story.

THEME and SETTING

In addition to having a plot, characters, a conflict and a resolution, all good stories will include a theme. The theme is really the writer’s main purpose for telling the story in the first place. The theme can deal with social issues, moral values, religious views and/or political opinions that the writer holds.

Now that the story has all of the above-mentioned elements, there is one last element that still needs to be added and that is the setting. The setting will usually describe when and where the story takes place. It will also include the time of the day and weather conditions. Each of these setting factors helps the reader to become part of the story as they can develop an image of the where and when and can draw upon their own life experiences as to time of day and weather conditions. The whole point of telling a story is to let the readers “experience” the story. The setting is where you try to paint a picture for the readers to see everything in their own minds which then brings the words of the story to life!

If you feel that you now have a good handle on understanding the different parts of a story then look at the following ten series of sentences or questions and see if you can determine which part of the story they are a part of and link them to the correct answer.
1.
Michael Richards was the biggest kid in the 9th grade. He was already close to being six feet tall. His eyes were a shocking, deep blue, almost black in some lights. He walked with self-assurance and deep conviction. He spoke rarely but when he did, everyone found what he had to say was very profound.
This section is part of the theme
This section is part of the setting
This section is part of the exposition
This section is part of the rising action
In this group of sentences we are learning about a character, i.e., Michael Richards. We have an idea of what he looks like and we even get a hint of what his personality is like. As he seems to possess some degree of wisdom, we can also guess that it will be his wisdom that will help him conquer the plot. All of this tells us that these sentences are part of the exposition of the story. Answer (c) is the correct answer
2.
Wrapping her sweater more tightly around her, Melanie stood on the front porch of the old plantation home and peered into the darkness. The approaching storm clouds had obliterated the moon making it near to impossible to see anything in the dark. In the distance she could her old Yelper barking so she was pretty certain that Caleb could not be too far away. After two long years battling in the war with the Union Army, his return would be bittersweet.
This section is the plot
This section is the setting
This section is the resolution
This section is the rising action
In this group of sentences we are learning about where Melanie is at (an old plantation). We also know that it must be nighttime as it is very dark and we learned that a storm is approaching. These descriptions are painting a picture for us to be able to visualize and even experience the scene. We also learned that it is taking place during the Civil War. Combined, these elements tell us that this section is the setting of the story making Answer (b) the correct answer
3.
Stan ducked into the shallow, darkened doorway and stood completely still for what seemed like an eternity. When no one appeared on either end of the street after five minutes, he felt certain that he had not been followed. Reaching inside his jacket he felt the large envelope that contained the evidence of what the company was planning. If he could not find someone at the bureau to trust, and find that person soon, then he knew that the entire town would be wiped out by the end of the month.
This section is the exposition
This section is the setting
This section is the falling action
This section is the rising action
In this section we are not learning anything about Stanley personally so it is not the exposition section. We also do not learn anything about where or when this is taking place nor do we even know what time of day it is or what the weather conditions might be so this is not the setting section. Nothing is being wrapped up about the story here either so, again, this is not the falling action section. However, we are getting a hint of a conflict. When we learn about the conflict we are in the rising action section making Answer (d) the correct answer
4.
They had faced a long hard journey together. Even though their pathways were about to take different turns, nothing would ever change the bond that now existed between them. They had been strangers at the beginning, even enemies for a time, but now they were eternal friends. They each knew that life’s road wasn’t about whom you were at the beginning – it’s about who you are at the end, despite all the odds that are or were stacked against you.
This section is the theme
This section is the rising action
This section is the falling action
This section is the exposition
In this series of sentences, it appears that the writer it summing up an opinion of how a person can change despite the odds that have been stacked against them. It is the purpose of why the author told the story. When the writer provides an opinion of the outcome of the story, this becomes an example of the theme of the story. Answer (a) is the correct answer for this section
5.
Patrick quietly looked over at Stan. He knew he would never fully understand the challenges he had faced over the past few weeks but he did know that he and the entire town would forever be in his debt. How do you repay someone for saving your life? Heck, how do you repay someone for saving 23,000 lives? He didn’t have any answer right now but he would find one. As for tonight, he was going to be able to have his first peaceful night of sleep knowing that tomorrow would dawn a new and much safer day!
This section is the falling action
This section is the resolution
This section is the rising action
This section is the theme
In this series of sentences we are not learning anything personal about Patrick so this is not the expository section. We learn nothing of the setting nor is there any mention of a climax. We are not getting any opinions interjected by the author so it is not about the theme of the story. We are, however, seeing a conclusion or wrapping up of the story. When the story is being concluded or wrapped up, it is the resolution section of the story. Answer (b) is the correct answer
6.
Derrick stopped his horse. He couldn’t leave things the way they had last ended. He didn’t want that for her. She deserved so much better. Resolved, he called out to Walker, “I’m heading back.” Walker stopped and turned around. “Leave it alone, Derrick. Nothing good will come of it.” Derrick shook his head. “Just because we got rid of those bandits doesn’t mean my job is done. I know she needs to move on but she needs to know the whole story. Only then can I move on.” “Okay,” Walker finally responded after several moments. “No loose ends then.” “Right,” Derrick replied. “No loose ends.” With that he pushed his horse into a gallop, already feeling better – already feeling as though the last four years were finally about to be behind him.
This section is the rising action
This section is the resolution
This section is the exposition
This section is the falling action
This series of sentences takes some looking at. We are not learning anything personal about the characters so we can eliminate it being the exposition section. We are also not learning about a conflict so we can also eliminate the rising action section. However, is it resolving or concluding the story or is it tying up loose ends. Really, the clue is written in the sentences when you see “No loose ends.” This section is dealing with wrapping up loose ends making it part of the falling action section. Answer (d) is the right answer
7.
Abigail had been dancing nearly all of her life and her body showed it. At the age of 34 her muscles were well honed. She walked with such grace that she appeared to float or glide rather than bounce up and down like most people. She wasn’t one to shy away from hard work either. Instead, she would tackle any task at hand with full gusto and determination to see it to the end. She was a go getter and she didn’t let her petite 5’2” height get in her way. She was a woman on a new mission and no one would stand in her way.
This section is the exposition
This section is the resolution
This section is the rising action
This section is the setting
In this group of sentences we are clearly learning about a character, i.e., Abigail. We have an idea of what she looks like and we even get a hint of what her personality is like. As she seems to possess strength and determination, we can also guess that it will be this strength and drive that will help her conquer the plot. All of this tells us that these sentences are part of the exposition of the story. Answer (a) is the correct answer
8.
Holding political office has turned many people who once had ideals into scoundrels. It’s all a part of playing the political game. It’s all about doing favors to get favors in return. Politicians lose sight of the very reasons they entered into office. Perhaps now is the time that we work towards changing those offices by setting time limits, curtailing the amount of power they have, making it easier to quickly remove them if they don’t accomplish the tasks the people elected them for and stopping all lobbying for agendas that go against the majorities’ views.
This section is the resolution
This section is the theme
This section is the rising action
This section is the falling action
In this series of sentences, it appears that the writer is summing up an opinion of politicians and political office. It is the purpose of why the author told the story. When the writer provides an opinion of the outcome of the story, this becomes an example of the theme of the story. Answer (b) is the correct answer for this section
9.
Jane and Alec ran through the house. They checked the attic and the basement. Outside they checked the barn, the fields even down by the lake but it was no use. They could not find their parents anywhere. “At least they didn’t kill them,” Alec finally spoke up as he clutched their only clue, an arrow that was pinned to the back of the front door. “They haven’t killed them yet, you mean,” Jane whispered, holding back the building up of tears. “And they won’t,” Alec quickly replied as he patted his sister’s shoulder. “As long as they don’t reveal where the gold mine is, they’ll be safe. Let’s just hope they don’t reveal it until we can get help to find them.”
This section is the falling action
This section is the resolution
This section is the rising action
This section is the exposition
In this section we are not learning anything about Jane and Alec personally so it is not the exposition section. We also do not learn anything about where or when this is taking place nor do we even know what time of day it is or what the weather conditions might be so this is not the setting section. Nothing is being wrapped up about the story here either so, again, this is not the falling action section. However, we are getting a hint of a conflict, i.e., the missing parents and a gold mine. When we learn about the conflict we are in the rising action section making Answer (c) the correct answer
10.
It was a time between times. The past was dead and buried and a new world had come forth. A world that chose to close itself off from its history and forbade any changes to its future. Everything that was to be taught and learned was closely monitored. No longer were mundane monthly calendars kept nor were any individual days recorded. The only measurements used to mark the passing of time was the time of the day itself and the passing of seasons. There was the season of rebirth, the season of long sun, the season of plenty, and the season of darkness. At least that is how it had been measured since the Big Occurrence. That was some 68 seasons of darkness ago.
This section is the falling action
This section is the setting
This section is the rising action
This section is the resolution
In this group of sentences we are learning about a time or a time that was between times. It foretells that the world has changed and a new world has emerged. In short, in this group of sentences we are being given the setting of the story so that our minds can try and paint a picture. Answer (b) is, therefore, the correct answer
Author:  Christine G. Broome

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