Reading - Craft and Structure - Similes
Karen and Cindy are as silly as a barrel of monkeys.

Reading - Craft and Structure - Similes

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When you compare two things to each other, we call this a simile. This is generally done by the use of the words: “is like”, “is as”, “are like”, “are as” or “than”. For an example, let’s look at the sentence: “The city is like a jungle.” In this instance, we are comparing a “city” with a “jungle”.

Similes are used when someone wants to create a more clear understanding of one thing but uses a different thing to try and give a clearer image of what they want to convey. In the sentence, “The city is like a jungle,” the person is trying to describe how busy and congested a city is. The image of a “jungle” conveys this image much more clearly.

1.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
Mr. Collins is as wise as an owl.
Mr. Collins - owl
owl - wise
Mr. Collins - wise
is - as
The words “is as” tell us we are comparing two things. In this case we are comparing “Mr. Collins” as he appears before the “is as” and “owl” that appears after. So Mr. Collins is compared to an owl.
2.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
The truck destroyed the house like a tornado.
house - tornado
destroyed - tornado
truck - tornado
truck - house
The word “like” is used to compare two different things. In this case, “truck” comes before “like” and “tornado” comes after. We are comparing “truck” to a “tornado”.
3.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
Jason is as clumsy as an ox.
Jason - clumsy
as - as
clumsy - ox
Jason - ox
Here we see the words “is as” that tell us we are comparing two things. In this case we are comparing “Jason” as he appears before the “is as” and “ox” that appears after. So Jason is compared to an ox.
4.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
His house looked like a dungeon.
His - like
house - dungeon
looked - like
His - dungeon
The word “like” tells us we are comparing two things. In this case we are comparing “house” as it appears before “like” and “dungeon” because it appears after “like”. So house is compared to a dungeon.
5.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
Richard and Stephen are like two peas in a pod.
Richard and Stephen - pod
peas - pod
two - peas
like - pod
The words “are like” are used to compare two different things. In this case, “Richard and Stephen” come before “are like” and peas in a “pod” comes after. We are comparing “Richard and Stephen” to a “pod”.
6.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
Karen and Cindy are as silly as a barrel of monkeys.
Karen - Cindy
barrel - monkeys
silly - monkeys
Karen and Cindy - monkeys
The words “are as” are used to compare two different things. In this case, “Karen and Cindy” come before “are as” and barrel of “monkeys” comes after. We are comparing “Karen and Cindy” to “monkeys”.
7.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
Carl’s ego is larger than Mount Everest.
Carl - Mount Everest
is - than
ego - Mount Everest
Carl - ego
The word “than” is used to compare two different things. In this case, ego is before “than” while Mount Everest comes after it. We are comparing Carl’s “ego” with “Mount Everest”.
8.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
Her feet were like two ice cubes.
Her - ice cubes
feet - ice cubes
two - ice cubes
were - like
The words “were like” are used to compare two different things. In this case, “feet” comes before “were like” and “ice cubes” comes after. We are comparing “feet” to “ice cubes”.
9.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
Eating chocolate cake is like being in heaven!
eating - like
eating - heaven
like - heaven
chocolate cake - heaven
As we have the words “is like” we know we are comparing two different things. In this case, “chocolate cake” comes before “is like” and “heaven” comes after. We are comparing “chocolate cake” to “heaven”.
10.
Can you find the two things that are being compared (similes)?
His head is as hard as nails.
is - as
hard - nails
head - nails
head - hard
“Is as” is used between the two things being compared. In this case “head” appears before the “is as” and “nails” appears after. So we are comparing the head to nails.
Author:  Christine G. Broome

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