Simile, Antonym, Onomatopoeia and Homonyms
My sister is as stubborn as a mule.

Simile, Antonym, Onomatopoeia and Homonyms

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Improve your writing by using similes, antonyms, onomatopoeia and homonyms. A simile is when you compare two things to each other. This is generally done by the use of the words: “is like”, “is as”, “are like”, “are as” or “than”. For an example, let’s look at the sentence: “Jay and Anne are like Mutt and Jeff.” In this instance, we are comparing a “Jay and Anne” with “Mutt and Jeff”.

Antonyms are two words that mean the opposite or nearly the opposite thing. For example, look as these two sentences. “Christopher is tall.” / “Christopher is short.” “Tall” and “short” are antonyms because they have opposite meanings.

Words that imitate sounds or ideas are known as onomatopoeia. For example, if you have two people who are kissing, you could say, “Smack! Went their lips.” “Smack” is used to convey the sound of the kiss.

Homonyms are words that are spelled the same but in their given context have different meanings. One example of this would be the word “belt”. This could refer to an accessory that is used to hold a pair of pants up or it could refer to how someone spoke out or sang as in, “Jane belt out the song in perfect pitch!”

1.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

Mason pulled a piece of bark off of the tree to add to his collection.
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
There are many words that can be used to describe several different things. Although in each context of a sentence the word is spelled the same, it has a different meaning. In this sentence we have the word “bark” that is describing the outer layer of a tree. However, it could also describe the sound a dog makes. Because the word “bark” has different meanings it is a homonym. Answer (d) is correct.
2.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

His brown eyes are like two deep pools of chocolate.
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
The words “are like” tells us that we are comparing two things. In this sentence we are comparing “brown eyes” to “pools of chocolate.” When you compare two or more things to each other you have a sentence that contains a simile. This makes Answer (a) correct.
3.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

Danny sat in the first row while Zachery sat in the last row.
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
This sentence tells us that Danny sat in the “first” row while Zachery sat in the “last” row. “First” and “last” are opposite of each other. As this sentence describes opposites, we have a sentence that has antonyms. Answer (b) is correct.
4.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

The cake she made was hard on the outside and soft in the middle.
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
This sentence tells us that the cake is “hard” but it is also “soft.” “Hard” and “soft” have opposite meanings. As this sentence describes opposite meanings, we have a sentence that has antonyms. Answer (b) is correct.
5.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

Can you please turn on the light?
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
There are many words that can be used to describe several different things. Although in each context of a sentence the word is spelled the same, it has a different meaning. In this sentence we have the word “light” that is describing a fixture such as a lamp. However, it could also be used describe weight or a shade of color. Because the word “light” has different meanings it is a homonym. Answer (d) is correct.
6.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

Kelly is happy one minute and sad the next minute.
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
This sentence tells us that Kelly is “happy” but then it tells us that she is “sad.” “Happy” and “sad” have opposite meanings. As this sentence describes opposite meanings, we have a sentence that has antonyms. Answer (b) is correct.
7.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

Ugh! You should see how much homework I have.
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
This sentence has a word that is describing a sound of disgust. The describing of sound through the use of words is known as an onomatopoeia. “Ugh” is an onomatopoeia making Answer (c) correct.
8.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

The house is like a palace with all its elegant rooms.
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
The words “is like” tells us that we are comparing two things. In this sentence we are comparing a “house” to a “palace.” When you compare two or more things to each other you have a sentence that contains a simile. This makes Answer (a) correct.
9.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

Honk, honk! The angry driver repeated over and over but the traffic didn’t move.
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
This sentence has words that are describing the sound of a car’s horn. The describing of sound through the use of words is known as an onomatopoeia. “Honk, honk” is an onomatopoeia making Answer (c) correct.
10.
Determine whether the sentence below contains a simile, an antonym, an onomatopoeia or a homonym.

My sister is as stubborn as a mule.
Simile
Antonym
Onomatopoeia
Homonym
The words “is as” tells us that we are comparing two things. In this sentence we are comparing “my sister” to a “mule.” When you compare two or more things to each other you have a sentence that contains a simile. This makes Answer (a) correct.
Author:  Christine G. Broome

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