Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations (Part 1)
“Oh my gosh!” Monica cried when she saw how short they had cut her hair.

Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations (Part 1)

This English Language quiz is called 'Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations (Part 1)' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

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Understanding words, sentences and punctuations is a step by step learning process. By now, you should now have a good foundation to work upon.

However, since there are so many various aspects of both the spoken and written word to remember, this quiz will give you a good opportunity to review new and old lessons on the English language. Some of the things that you should have a fairly good understanding of include nouns, verbs and various types of verbs, adverbs, adjectives, contractions, pronouns, prepositions, possessive pronouns, synonyms, antonyms, predicates and the like.

You should also be familiar with sentence structures (including simple, compound, complex and compound-complex). In addition, you should have a good grasp on knowing punctuation marks such as the period, question mark, exclamation point, colons, semicolons, commas, quotation marks and the like, as well as their correct usage and their placements in writing.

1.
What is a declarative sentence?
A sentence that gives direction or a command
A sentence that expresses strong emotions or excitement
A sentence that makes a simple statement
A sentence that asks a question
A declarative sentence is one that makes a simple statement. For example: Nelson tried out for the lead in the school play. A declarative statement ends with the punctuation mark of the period (.). Answer (c) is the correct answer.
2.
What is the subject of a sentence?
It is a word that shows action
It tells us about whom or what the sentence is about
It is a word that modifies a verb
A word that replaces one or more nouns
The subject of a sentence tells us about whom or what the sentence is about. For example: “The ball is red.” The “ball” is the subject. The correct meaning is Answer (b).
3.
What is a nominative case pronoun?
It is when two or more adjectives are used in a sequence to describe the same noun
It is when the pronoun is used as the subject in a sentence
It is when the pronouns me, you, him, us, it, her and them are used as a direct object, indirect object or an object of a preposition
It is a word that describes, identifies or further defines a noun or a pronoun
A nominative case pronoun is when the pronoun is used as the subject in a sentence. For example: “He broke the vase.” In this sentence, “He” is a pronoun but “he” is also the subject of the sentence making it a nominative case pronoun. Answer (b) is the correct answer.
4.
What is a linking verb?
It is word (or group of words) that is used to connect other words, phrases, clauses or sentences together
It’s a word that shows ownership or possession of singular and plural nouns
It connects the subject in a sentence with the predicate of the sentence
It is the use of words to imitate a sound or idea
A linking verb is a verb that connects the subject in a sentence with the predicate of the sentence. For example: “Mr. Arnold is blind.” In this sentence, “Mr. Arnold” is the subject and “blind” is the predicate. “Is” is the linking verb. Answer (c) is the correct meaning.
5.
What is a predicate?
It tells us something about the subject
A word that means the opposite or nearly the opposite thing of another word
A word or phrase that means the same thing
A word that identifies or further defines a noun or a pronoun
A predicate is a word or group of words that tells us something about the subject of a sentence. For example: “The dog was huge.” The “dog” is the subject. What can we learn about the dog in this sentence? That he was “huge”. “Huge” is a predicate making the correct answer, Answer (a).
6.
What is a root word?
The first few letters that come before a word to give it a different meaning
The last few letters that come after a word to alter or define a words meaning
The definition given to a word
A word that can stand alone on its own
A root word is a word that can stand on its own. For example: let’s look at the word “example.” The root word here is “ample” as it can stand on its own as a separate word. “Ample” means a quantity of or enough. When you remove the root word, you are left with “ex.” “Ex” is the prefix to “ample.” Answer (d) is the correct definition of a root word.
7.
“Oh my gosh!” Monica cried when she saw how short they had cut her hair.
A sentence that gives direction or a command
A sentence that expresses strong emotions or excitement
A sentence that makes a simple statement
A sentence that asks a question
An exclamatory sentence is one in which strong emotions or excitement is expressed. The sentence ends with the exclamation (!) punctuation mark. Answer (b) is, therefore, the correct definition we are looking for here.
8.
What is a compound-complex sentence?
A combination of the compound sentence having two or more independent subjects or clauses and where you have at least one independent clause and one dependent clause linked to it
A sentence made up of three parts - a subject, a verb and an object
When an independent clause is linked to a dependent clause
When two or more independent subjects or clauses are linked together by a conjunction
A compound-complex sentence is a combination of the compound sentence having two or more independent subjects or clauses and the complex sentence where you have at least one independent clause and one dependent clause. For example: “Veronica married Dillon in March and Sandy married Eric in April so they say.” A compound sentence is when two independent subjects or clauses are linked together with a conjunction so in our sentence here, “Veronica married Dillon in March,” and “Sandy married Eric in April,” we find two independent subjects linked together by the conjunction “and”. Each of these sentences can stand on their own. A complex sentence is composed of an independent subject or clause that is linked to a dependent clause. A dependent clause cannot stand on its own as a complete sentence. Now, in the second half of our sentence we have, “Sandy married Eric in April so they say.” “So they say,” is a dependent clause that cannot stand on its own. The entire sentence is a prime example, then, of a compound-complex sentence. Answer (a) is correct.
9.
What is an indefinite pronoun?
When two or more independent subjects or clauses are linked together by a conjunction
It is always an adjective and includes the words: that, this, these and those
It is always an adjective and includes words such as: each, some, few, many, another and both
It is always an adjective and includes the words: whose, what and which
An indefinite pronoun is always an adjective. It includes words that do not define a specific number but, rather, points to a general amount with words such as each, some, few, many, another, both and all. Answer (c) is the correct definition for an indefinite pronoun.
10.
What is a transitive verb?
A verb that is found in a sentence that does not have an object
It tells us what the subject is doing
A word that replaces a one or more nouns
It is when an object receives an action
A transitive verb is when an object receives an action. For example: “He hit the ball out of the park.” “Hit” is the action. What was hit? The “ball” is the object that was hit and so it received the action. This makes the verb “hit” a transitive verb. Answer (d) is the correct meaning for transitive verb.
Author:  Christine G. Broome

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