Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations (Part 2)

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Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations (Part 2)

This English Language quiz is called 'Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations (Part 2)' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

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Since the English language can be quite complicated to learn and come to a good understanding of, up till now, you have been learning words, sentences and punctuations through a step by step learning process. As there are so many various aspects of both the spoken and written word to remember, this second quiz will give you a good opportunity to test yourself.

1.
What is an ellipsis?
A punctuation mark that shows that something has been added or changed to the original text
A punctuation mark that is used to replace a letter or letters and connect one word with another
A punctuation mark place around information that is not necessarily needed in a sentence
A series of dots that show the reader that a word or a group of words have been left out on purpose
An ellipsis is a series of dots (3 dots - or - 4 dots when it comes at the end of a sentence) that show the reader that a word or a group of words have been left out of written text on purpose. For example: “Can you recite the Pledge of Allegiance? It starts out: ‘I pledge allegiance to the flag….’” Answer (d) gives the correct meaning for an ellipsis.
2.
What is a suffix?
A group of letters that are placed before a root word
A cluster of letters that make up a simple word
A group of letters that, on their own, do not make up a complete word
A group of letters that change the tense of a verb
A suffix is a group of letters that, on their own, do not make up a complete word. Rather, they come at the end of a root word and can change the meaning of a root word or more clearly define a root word. For example, let’s look at the root word “state”. This could refer to a condition or mood or a place. Now let’s add the suffix “ment” to the end of the root word and now we get “statement.” This refers to what someone has said or to a bill or invoice. The letters “ment” as you can see, do not represent a complete word. Answer (c) is the correct meaning of a suffix.
3.
What is a complex sentence?
A sentence in which an independent clause is linked with a dependent clause
A sentence that has two or more independent subjects linked by a conjunction
A sentence that has two or more independent subject or clauses and one of the independent clauses is linked with a dependent clause
A sentence that runs on and includes multiple subjects, verbs and objects
A complex sentence is a sentence in which an independent clause is linked with a dependent clause. For example: “She watched the bees zig zag.” “She watched the bees” is an independent clause and can stand on its own as a complete sentence. However, “zig zag” is a dependent clause and is not a complete sentence. Answer (a) is the correct meaning for a complex sentence.
4.
What is a semicolon?
A punctuation mark used when the difference between two separate statements is being emphasized
A punctuation mark to illustrate a point
A punctuation mark used to show strong emotions or expressions
A punctuation mark used when introducing a list
A semicolon (;) is a punctuation mark that is used when the difference between two separate statements is being emphasized. For example: “Sandy has no problem finding her way around town; however, she is completely at a loss driving any other place.” There are two separate sentences here, i.e., “Sandy has no problem finding her way around town” and “She is completely at a loss driving any other place.” The two sentences are then joined by the conjunction word “however.” The first sentence is ended with the semicolon (;) followed by a conjunction and then a pause (comma after “however”) and, finally, the second sentence. Answer (a) is the correct meaning.
5.
What is a compound sentence?
A sentence that runs on and includes multiple subjects, verbs and objects
A sentence that has two or more independent subject or clauses and one of the independent clauses is linked with a dependent clause
A sentence in which there is no object
A sentence that has two or more independent subjects linked by a conjunction
A compound sentence is a sentence that has two or more independent subjects that are linked by a conjunction. For example: “Peggy bought some gum and Jennifer bought a Snickers bar.” “Peggy” and “Jennifer” are two independent subjects. “Peggy bought some gum,” and “Jennifer bought a Snickers bar,” are two complete sentences that can exist or stand on their own. They are linked by the conjunction “and” making this a compound sentence. Answer (d) is the correct meaning for a compound sentence.
6.
What is an imperative sentence?
A sentence made up of three parts - a subject, a verb and an object
A sentence that gives direction, instructions or a command
A sentence that asks a question
A sentence that expresses strong emotions and/or excitement
An imperative sentence is a sentence that gives direction, instructions or a command. For example: “Put the clothes in the drier as soon as the washer has stopped.” An imperative sentence ends with a period (.). Answer (b) is the correct meaning of an imperative sentence.
7.
What is an antonym?
A word that means the same or nearly the same as another word
A word that sounds the same as another word but is spelled differently
A word that means the opposite or nearly the opposite of another word
A word that is spelled the same but has a different meaning in the context of a sentence
An antonym is a word that means the opposite of or nearly the opposite of another word. For example: “Karen was happy when she saw her old boyfriend.” Rewritten: “Karen was sad when she saw her old boyfriend.” “Happy” and “sad” have opposition meanings and so they are antonyms of each other. Answer (c) is the correct meaning for antonym.
8.
What are homonyms?
Words that sounds the same as one another but are spelled differently
Words that say one thing but mean something else
Words used to imitate sound
Words that are spelled the same but have different meanings given the context of a sentence
Homonyms are words that are spelled the same but, in their given context in a sentence, have different meanings. For example: “Nancy was the lead singer in her school choir,” – or – “They had to get all of the lead out of the house before they could move in.” In the first sentence Nancy was the “head” of the singers or the prominent singer. In the second sentence we are talking about a metal that can be toxic. The word is spelled the same in each sentence but clearly has a different meaning in the context of the sentences. Answer (d) is the correct meaning needed.
9.
What is a reflexive pronoun?
It is a pronoun that can ask a question
It is a pronoun that refers back to the subject of a sentence
It is a pronoun that does not define a specific number but, rather, points to a general number
It is a pronoun that answers the questions “Which one?”
A reflexive pronoun is a pronoun that refers back to the subject of the sentence. For example: “The Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco is itself one of the longest suspension bridges in the world.” In this sentence the “Golden Gate Bridge” is the subject, “is” is the verb and “itself” is the object. San Francisco is not the object because the sentence is not about San Francisco but it is about the bridge. Since the subject “Golden Gate Bridge” and the object “itself” are the same thing, “itself” is the reflexive pronoun of “Golden Gate Bridge.” Answer (b) is the correct meaning here.
10.
What is an abbreviation?
A shortened form of a word
A punctuation mark that makes a statement
A punctuation mark that shows possession
A foreign word that replaces an English word
An abbreviation is a shortened form of a word. For example: “Mister” can be shortened to read “Mr.” Answer (a) gives the correct meaning for an abbreviation.
Author:  Christine G. Broome

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