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Vocabulary - Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations (Part 2)

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Vocabulary - Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations (Part 2)

This English Language quiz is called 'Vocabulary - Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations (Part 2)' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

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Understanding Words, Sentences and Punctuations will test you on antonyms and sentence types – and lots more! The English language (and all languages) is filled with rules regarding types of word (nouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, contractions, pronouns, prepositions, possessive pronouns, synonyms, antonyms and the like), sentence structures (simple, compound, complex and compound-complex) and punctuation marks (period, question mark, exclamation point, colons, semicolons, commas, quotation marks and the like) and their correct usage and their placements in writing.

In order to follow the rules correctly, it is important that you know and understand the meanings and intentions of each word, sentence and punctuation mark.

1.
What is a homophone?
A word that shows the relationship between a noun or pronoun and other words in a sentence.
The proper name given to a noun.
Two words that mean the same or nearly the same thing.
A word that sounds the same as another word but is spelled differently and has a different meaning.
A homophone is a word that sounds the same as another word but is spelled differently and has a different meaning. For example: “She needed to buy some stationery to write a letter.” “Stationery” and “stationary” are two words that sound the same but are spelled differently and have different meanings. The first word, stationery” is paper to write on. The second stationary is when you stand still. Answer (d) is the correct meaning for a homophone.
2.
What is a simile?
Two words that mean the same or nearly the same thing.
When you compare two things to each other.
Two words that have opposite meanings.
Words that sound alike but are spelled differently.
A simile is when you compare two things to each other. For example: “His bedroom looked like a pig sty.” Here the “bedroom” and “pig sty” are being compared to be the same thing. The correct meaning is Answer (b).
3.
What is a compound-complex sentence?
A combination of the compound sentence having two or more independent subjects or clauses and where you have at least one independent clause and one dependent clause linked to it.
A sentence made up of three parts - a subject, a verb and an object.
When two or more independent subjects or clauses are linked together by a conjunction.
When an independent clause is linked to a dependent clause.
A compound-complex sentence is a combination of the compound sentence having two or more independent subjects or clauses and where you have at least one independent clause and one dependent clause linked to it. For example: “Sally went to the supermarket and found the cheese.” The first half of the sentence, “Sally went to the supermarket,” is an independent clause, it can stand alone as a complete sentence. However, “found the cheese” is a dependent clause because it cannot stand alone as a separate sentence. Answer (a), therefore, is the correct meaning.
4.
What is an exclamatory sentence?
A sentence that asks a question.
A sentence that expresses strong emotions or excitement.
A sentence that gives direction or a command.
A sentence that makes a statement and ends with a period (.).
An exclamatory sentence is a sentence that expresses strong emotions or excitement. For example: “I still can’t believe that I actually won the gold ribbon!” Answer (b) gives the correct meaning for an exclamatory sentence.
5.
What is a conjunction?
A word that shows the relationship between a noun or pronoun and other words in a sentence.
A word (or group of words) that is used to connect other words, phrases, clauses or sentences together.
A word that sounds like another word but has a different meaning.
A word that replaces one or more nouns.
A conjunction is a word or group of words that is used to connect other words, phrases, clauses or sentences together. For example: “He went to the gas station but he forgot to go to the store.” The word “but” is a conjunction word that connects two sentences, i.e., “He went to the gas station,” and “he forgot to go to the store.” Answer (b) is the correct meaning needed.
6.
What is a declarative sentence?
A sentence that gives direction or a command.
A sentence that asks a question.
A sentence that expresses strong emotions or excitement.
A sentence that makes a statement and ends with a period (.).
A declarative sentence is a sentence that makes a statement and ends with a period. For example: “Joseph mowed the lawn when he got home from work.” Answer (d) gives the correct meaning for a declarative sentence.
7.
What is a simple sentence?
A combination of the compound sentence having two or more independent subjects or clauses and where you have at least one independent clause and one dependent clause linked to it.
When an independent clause is linked to a dependent clause.
A sentence made up of three parts - a subject, a verb and an object.
When two or more independent subjects or clauses are linked together by a conjunction.
A simple sentence is made up of three parts - a subject, a verb and an object. For example: “Abigail baked a chocolate cake.” “Abigail” is the subject. “Baked” is the verb. “Chocolate cake” is the object. Answer (c) is the correct meaning of a simple sentence.
8.
What is an antonym?
Two words that mean the opposite or nearly the opposite thing.
Two words that mean the same or nearly the same thing.
Two words that are spelled differently but have the same meaning.
A word that connects an independent sentence with a dependent sentence.
An antonym is two words that mean the opposite or nearly opposite thing. For example: “Fred’s car is huge.” / “Fred’s car is tiny.” “Huge” and “tiny” have opposite meanings; therefore, they are antonyms. Answer (a) is the correct meaning.
9.
What is an onomatopoeia?
Words that are spelled the same but in context have a different meaning.
A word or phrase that means the same thing.
A word that describes or identifies or further defines a noun or pronoun.
The use of words to imitate sound or an idea.
An onomatopoeia is a word or group of words that are used to imitate sound or an idea. For example: “His cereal went snap, crackly and pop!” The words “snap”, “crackly” and “pop” all demonstrate the sound the cereal made. Answer (d) is the correct meaning for onomatopoeia.
10.
What are quotation marks?
Marks used to show possession.
Marks used to show where a letter or letters are missing.
Marks used to enclose words that were originally stated from another source.
Marks used to show strong emotion.
Quotation marks are marks used to enclose words that were originally stated from another source. For example: “Look both ways before you cross the street,” his mother yelled. The quotation marks are used to show what the mother yelled. Answer (c) is, therefore, the correct meaning for quotation marks.
Author:  Christine G. Broome

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