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Writing a Paragraph
There is a lot more to painting a room than simply slapping up some paint on the wall.

Writing a Paragraph

This English Language quiz is called 'Writing a Paragraph' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

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Narrative, descriptive and expository are all styles of paragraphs. During classes, you most likely learned that there are three different types or styles of paragraphs. It is a good time to revisit what you learned as you will soon have to draw upon that knowledge in order to start creating many of your own written pieces of work.

For each of the sentences listed below, determine if it is a topic sentence, a supporting sentence(s) a concluding sentence or a run-on sentence.
1.
Have you ever wondered how people are able to create and sign all those amazing and entertaining computer games?
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
Reading this sentence the first thing the reader can determine is that the writer will be discussing the creation and design of computer games. In today’s technologically advanced world, this is a great “topic” sentence! Answer (a) is correct.
2.
Sarah packed her bags for her trip to Europe, Africa, South America and Australia she included plenty of books to read on the flights they would be longer than she wanted to think about the excitement she felt now was sure to wear off.
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
This sentence contains multiple clauses, i.e., “Sarah packed her bags for her trip to Europe, Africa, South America and Australia,” “She included plenty of books to read on the flights,” “They would be longer than she wanted to think about,” and “The excitement she felt now was sure to wear off.” Each of these clauses can stand alone as separate sentences but in this sentence, none of them are linked to each other using either punctuation marks or conjunctions. When two or more independent clauses are included within a sentence without the use of the proper punctuations and/or conjunctions, the sentence is a “run-on” sentence. Answer (d) is the correct Answer.
3.
Waterfalls are an amazing testament to the beauty Mother Nature has to offer us. They are found in almost every country in the world. This book will focus on the top ten largest waterfalls known to man. Among the top ten are the Angel Falls in Venezuela, the Inga Falls in the Dominican Republic, the Victoria Falls on the Zambezi River and the Niagara Falls in North America.
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
We have a series of sentences here that are giving the reader information about the topic of waterfalls. In this portion of a paragraph the reader is given information about where waterfalls can be found and directs the reader that the book will be about the top ten waterfalls. However, there is no sentence that provides any conclusion nor does it lead the reader to a new paragraph. This series of sentences is, therefore, an example of supporting sentences. Answer (b) is correct.
4.
Now that you have a list of the steps needed to build a go-cart, we can move forward with each of these steps and actually build your dream!
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
The first phrase in this sentence (now that you have a list of the steps) gives the reader an indication that something is being concluded, i.e., the steps to building a go-cart. The sentence also leads the reader to read on to learn how to put those steps into action. Answer (c) is the correct sentence type used here.
5.
Peter and Albert went to the baseball game James and Harold went to the hockey game.
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
This sentence contains two clauses, i.e., “Peter and Albert went to the baseball game” and “James and Harold went to the hockey game.” However, there is no proper punctuation mark or conjunction used to join the two clauses together. When this happens, the sentence is known as a “run-on’ sentence. Answer (d) is the correct answer here.
6.
There is a lot more to painting a room than simply slapping up some paint on the wall. Although it may not seem fun, if you do not prepare your walls for the proper kind of paint, or use the proper brushes, you will find yourself facing a disaster. So if you want to have a showpiece of a room, be patient. By following the guidelines provided here - your room will look professional.
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
Here we have a series of sentences that are giving the reader information that appears to be supporting a topic, i.e., painting a room. This portion of a paragraph is providing the reader with information regarding the fact that there is a proper way to paint that involves preparation first. There is no concluding sentence nor does it lead the reader on to a new paragraph. This series of sentences are simply supporting a topic and shows that Answer (b) is correct.
7.
Have you ever wanted to become an extra in a Hollywood movie?
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
With this sentence the first thing the reader comes to know is that the writer is going to write about being able to appear as an extra in a movie! Just about anyone has probably wanted to do this at one time or another in their life so it is a great “topic” sentence. Answer (a) is the correct answer here.
8.
So, if you are not very easily frightened, then come along on this adventure through the most dangerous places that can be found on Earth!
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
The first word in this sentence, i.e., “so,” gives the reader a clue that the sentence is going to be wrapping something up and/or directing the reader to move forward to find out more information. It is, therefore, a concluding sentence making Answer (c) the correct answer.
9.
Boris Karloff was not the only monster character that frightened many for generations, there were others, some even more horrific and definitely more gruesome but you’ll have to read on to learn who they were and what made them so special.
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
The first phrase in this sentence (Boris Karloff was not the only monster character that frightened many) gives the reader an indication that something more will be forthcoming. The sentence appears to conclude that there are other characters who were also frightening, even more frightening, and then it leads the reader to continue to read on to learn about those other characters. This sentence is clearly a concluding sentence to a paragraph making Answer (c) correct.
10.
She sang he danced.
Topic
Supporting
Concluding
Run-on
This sentence contains two clauses, i.e., “She sang” and “he danced.” However, there is no proper punctuation mark or conjunction used to join the two clauses together. When this happens, the sentence is known as a “run-on’ sentence. Answer (d) is the correct answer here.
Author:  Christine G. Broome

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