Writing - Quoting, Paraphrasing and Summarizing
Do you have a dream?

Writing - Quoting, Paraphrasing and Summarizing

This English Language quiz is called 'Writing - Quoting, Paraphrasing and Summarizing' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

It costs only $12.50 per month to play this quiz and over 3,500 others that help you with your school work. You can subscribe on the page at Join Us

Whenever you are called upon to write a paper, whether that be for a book report, a research paper, an essay, a term paper or whatever, many times the source material you are gathering your information from contains amazing language that says something far better than you believe you can.

It is at this point that some people get in quite a bit of trouble, especially if they copy, word-for-word, what someone else wrote. When that happens the writer has committed plagiarism. Plagiarism is the wrongful use of another person’s piece of written and sometimes spoken work without giving credit to the original author. The one thing that you never – ever want to do is to plagiarize someone else’s materials.

But there are things that you can do to capture that writing, that saying or that paragraph that you so admired. You can do this through quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing. So now we are left with the questions of, what is the difference, if any, between quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing? To answer that question, let’s look at each one of these separately.

Quoting: When you quote the original source, you only use a segment of that source. To let your reader know that you are using someone else’s written work, you place quotation marks (“”) around the words that are being quoted word-for-word and then you give credit to the original author. For example:

Although I believe in magic, “as it is the essence of every human’s nature to want to believe” (John S. Wilcox; The Magician), I find that as I get older…

In this example the reader can clearly see that the words “as it is the essence of every human’s nature to want to believe” were taken from another source and are not the writer’s words and then the (John S. Wilcox, The Magician) tells the reader who the original writer of those words were and where those words came from, i.e., the book The Magician. It is not always necessary to reference the book in the body of your writing but it should be listed in the index. There are many variations you could use here and each would be correct and acceptable. For example, the above could have been written as either of the following:

Although I believe in magic, “as it is the essence of every human’s nature to want to believe” (John S. Wilcox), I find that as I get older…

Although I believe in magic as John S. Wilcox stated in his book The Magician, “as it is the essence of every human’s nature to want to believe,” I find that as I get older…

In each of these examples, the writer is giving the original source full credit for the quoted material.

Paraphrasing: When paraphrasing you take material from the original source and then you reword it using your own words. Mostly, after you have paraphrased, the paraphrased work will be shorter than the original piece of work. When you do paraphrase, you always let the reader know that is what you are doing. Let’s look at the following source material and then below that, let’s look at a paraphrasing of that source material.

Original Source:

Students frequently overuse direct quotation in taking notes, and as a result they overuse quotations in the final [research] paper. Probably only about 10% of your final manuscript should appear as directly quoted matter. Therefore, you should strive to limit the amount of exact transcribing of source materials while taking notes. Lester, James D. Writing Research Papers. 2nd ed. (1976): 46-47.

Paraphrasing:

In research papers students often quote excessively, failing to keep quoted material down to a desirable level. Since the problem usually originates during note taking, it is essential to minimize the material recorded verbatim (Lester 46-47).

As you can see, the paraphrasing of the source materials gives you the same information but in a scaled down manner. Even the resource, i.e., Lester 46-47, was scaled down but the reference was still given!

Summarizing: When summarizing an original source, you are using your own words to address the main points of the original source. Because you only focus on the main points, summaries are generally quite short. Again, as with quoting and paraphrasing, you must give credit back to the original writer and, at the same time, disclose that what you are providing is only a summary and that if they want to see the entire source, then they can go to that source. (You will provide that information in your index.)

Here is an example of summarizing an original source, in fact, let’s summarize the above Original Source.

Summarizing:

Students should take just a few notes in direct quotation from sources to help minimize the amount of quoted material in a research paper (Lester 46-47).

As you can see, the summary is very brief compared to the original source and includes less wordage from even that of paraphrasing.

Once you can master these three acceptable ways of using original material, it will greatly help you in your writing endeavors both now and in the future.

Now for the quiz. For each of the following written pieces of work, see if you can determine if the piece is a piece of plagiarism, quoting, paraphrasing or summarizing. Determining that might not be as easy as you first think so take your time and be certain before choosing the correct answer.

1.
So how can you determine a person’s character? I believe Abraham Lincoln said it best when he said, “Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.”
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
One of the first things we can see is that there are quotation marks used in this short piece and there is credit given to what is contained within the quotation marks, i.e., to Abraham Lincoln. Therefore, this is not plagiarism, nor is it paraphrasing or summarizing. It is a clear example of quoting making Answer (b) correct
2.
Since the H7N9 virus is extremely unpredictable in its ability to pass from one person to another, officials are watching it intensely to avoid a human pandemic. (Fox, NBC News, 2013).
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
One thing that we can see here is that there are no quotation marks in this piece so it is not using the method of quotation. The piece does give credit to an original source, i.e., (Fox, NBC News, 2013). Since it is giving credit to an original source it is not plagiarism. That leaves paraphrasing and summarizing. This piece is very brief and it focuses on a main point, the H7N9 virus. When a piece is brief and focuses on a main point or points, it is an example of a summary. Therefore, Answer (d) is correct
3.
According to M. Thomas Inge, the comic strip, Peanuts, has a great influence on our present-day culture (104).
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
This is a very brief piece that has no quotation marks so it is not using the method of quotation. The piece does give credit to an original source, i.e., (M. Thomas Inge). Since it is giving credit to an original source it is not plagiarism. That leaves paraphrasing and summarizing. As stated, this is very brief and focuses on a main point, Peanuts' influence on present-day culture. When a piece is brief and focuses on a main point or points, it is an example of a summary. Answer (d) is correct
4.
As discussed in the biography on PBS’s American Experience web page, sharpshooter Annie Oakley lived through a period of many liberating changes for women, from the Victorian era through the first quarter of the 20th century. Examples include voting rights for women as well as the freedom to wear comfortable and practical clothing (Annie Oakley).
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
The first thing we can see is that there are no quotation marks in this piece so it is not using the method of quotation. The piece does give credit to an original source, i.e., (Annie Oakley). Since it is giving credit to an original source it is not plagiarism. That leaves paraphrasing and summarizing. In truth, there is a bit much here to be a summary so we can rule that out which means this is a piece of paraphrasing making Answer (c) correct
5.
The legal system is made up of civil courts, criminal courts and specialty courts such as family law courts and bankruptcy courts. Each court has its own jurisdiction, which refers to the cases that the court is allowed to hear. In some instances, a case can only be heard in one type of court. For example, a bankruptcy case must be heard in a bankruptcy court. In other instances, there may be several potential courts with jurisdiction. For example, a federal criminal court and a state criminal court would each have jurisdiction over a crime that is a federal drug offense but that is also an offense on the state level.
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
Reading this passage there is one thing that is blaringly missing. Can you see it? Right, there is no credit being given anywhere. Therefore, this is a clear example of plagiarism. Answer (a) is correct
6.
The rise of industry, the growth of cities, and the expansion of the population were the three great developments of late nineteenth century American history. As new, larger, steam-powered factories became a feature of the American landscape in the East, they transformed farm hands into industrial laborers, and provided jobs for a rising tide of immigrants. With industry came urbanization - the growth of large cities (like Fall River, Massachusetts, where the Bordens lived) which became the centers of production as well as of commerce and trade.
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
Reading this passage there is one thing that is blaringly missing. Can you see it? Right, there is no credit being given anywhere. Therefore, this is a clear example of plagiarism. Credit should have been given to (Joyce Williams et al, Lizzie Borden: A Case Book of Family and Crime in the 1890s). Answer (a) is correct
7.
While some medical students have been found out to be guilty of the vice of smoking, their bad habit varies geographically. More is yet to be studied about this phenomenon (Brenner & Scharrer, 1996).
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
The first thing we can see is that there are no quotation marks in this piece so it is not using the method of quotation. The piece does give credit to an original source, i.e., (Brenner & Scharrer, 1996). Since it is giving credit to an original source it is not plagiarism. That leaves paraphrasing and summarizing. This one is a little tricky, especially since you do not have the original source. As it is very brief you might believe that it is a summary but the subject matter is too broad to be a summary. Therefore, this is a piece of paraphrasing making Answer (c) correct
8.
A lot of our knowledge of history comes from movies, stories, and television. Not all of this knowledge is true even though we might think it is. (Mintz, S.; The First Americans).
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
This is a very brief piece that has no quotation marks so it is not using the method of quotation. The piece does give credit to an original source, i.e., (Mintz, S.; The First Americans). Since it is giving credit to an original source it is not plagiarism. That leaves paraphrasing and summarizing. As stated, this is very brief and focuses on a main point, where we get a lot of our knowledge. When a piece is brief and focuses on a main point or points, it is an example of a summary. Answer (d) is correct
9.
In Martin Luther King, Jr.’s speech on “I have a dream,” people of all backgrounds joined the movement to unify the nation.
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
One of the first things we can see is that there are quotation marks used in this short piece and there is credit given to what is contained within the quotation marks. Therefore, this is not plagiarism, nor is it paraphrasing or summarizing. It is a clear example of quoting making Answer (b) correct
10.
The United States, Germany, Japan and other economies are being dramatically changed from industrial economies to knowledge and information based service economies as manufacturing shifts to countries where the wages are low cost. In knowledge and information economies, knowledge and information are the focus in economic growth (Laudon & Laudon, 2000).
Plagiarism
Quoting
Paraphrasing
Summarizing
The first thing we can see is that there are no quotation marks in this piece so it is not using the method of quotation. The piece does give credit to an original source, i.e., (Laudon & Laudon, 2000). Since it is giving credit to an original source it is not plagiarism. That leaves paraphrasing and summarizing. As there is a bit of information presented here, it is too much information to be a summary so we can rule that out which means this is a piece of paraphrasing making Answer (c) correct
Author:  Christine G. Broome

© Copyright 2016-2019 - Education Quizzes
TJS - Web Design Lincolnshire
View Printout in HTML

Valid HTML5

We use cookies to make your experience of our website better.

To comply with the new e-Privacy directive, we need to ask for your consent - I agree - No thanks - Find out more