Check out our new app Reduce screen time App access to 1,000’s of quizzes Happy parents Find out more
Writing - The Business Letter

How much do you know about writing business letters?

Writing - The Business Letter

This English Language quiz is called 'Writing - The Business Letter' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

It costs only $12.50 per month to play this quiz and over 3,500 others that help you with your school work. You can subscribe on the page at Join Us

The subject of this quiz will not be new to you but it is a good time to review the proper ways to format letters, specifically business letters. When writing letters there are really only two forms that need to be followed, i.e., the informal and the formal. The formal letter is your business letter.

When writing a formal letter you will never use a salutation (greeting) such as “Hi” or “Hello” or “Howdy.” Each of these salutations should only be found in an informal, more personal letter such as to a friend or a family member. Rather, a business salutation will include “Dear ___” or “To Whom It May Concern” or “Judge _____” or “Representative _____” or “Congressman _____.”

Another difference between the two styles of letters is that after the salutation of an informal letter, a comma will be used whereas after a formal salutation a colon (:) will be used.

Informal: Hi Jane,

Formal: Dear Jane:

In the next couple of years you will begin to write letters to teachers and colleges in preparation of attending college. College preparation begins in the 9th grade, not the 12th grade. Understanding that you will soon be required to start writing formal business letters, it is good to get in a little practice now since you probably already have the informal letter writing down pat. See below for more details.

Go straight to Quiz

 

 

 

 

1.
There are how many kinds of letters?
6
4
8
2
There are two forms of letters that can be written. That includes the formal and the informal. Answer (d) is correct
2.
Of the greetings listed below, which would you NOT see in a formal business letter?
Dear Sir:
Hi Y'all,
To Whom It May Concern:
The Honorable Judge Mason:
Answers (a), (c) and (d) are all examples of a professional, business greeting. However, Answer (b) is a greeting reserved for a friend or family member so it is NOT part of a formal letter. Answer (b) is correct
3.
Which of the four examples below would be an example of a formal closing?
Very truly yours,
With love,
Affectionately yours,
TTFN,
Answers (b) and (c) are closings reserved for informal letters to friends and family and would be inappropriate in a business letter. Answer (d) “TTFN” (stands for Ta Ta For Now) would also be reserved for an informal letter. Abbreviating a closing is not proper in a formal business letter making Answer (a) correct
4.
In which part of the letter would you see: 1217 Adams Avenue, Harrisville, PA?
The closing
The salutation
The sender's address
The body
Given the four choices, you would find 1217 Adams Avenue, Harrisville, PA located in the sender’s address section at the top of the page. Answer (c) is the correct answer
5.
When every line, including the sender’s address, the date, the recipient’s address, the salutation, the body, the closing and the signature are justified to the left-hand side of the page, this is known as:
modified blocking
indenting
semi-blocking
blocking
When every line, including the sender’s address, the date, the recipient’s address, the salutation, the body, the closing and the signature are justified to the left-hand side of the page, this is known as blocking. Answer (d) is the correct answer
6.
When every line, including the sender’s address, the date, the recipient’s address, the salutation, the closing and the signature are justified to the left-hand side of the page but the first line of each paragraph is indented, this is known as:
blocking
semi-blocking
modified blocking
partial blocking
When every line, including the sender’s address, the date, the recipient’s address, the salutation, the closing and the signature are justified to the left-hand side of the page but the first line of each paragraph is indented, this is known as semi-blocking Answer (b) is correct
7.
July 4, 2014 would be found in what part of a letter?
The date
The closing
The sender's address
The recipient's address
July 4, 2014 would be found in the date section of a letter. Answer (a) is correct
8.
When every line, except for the sender’s address, the date, the closing and the signature, are justified to the left-hand side of the page, this is known as:
blocking
semi-blocking
modern blocking
modified blocking
When every line, except for the sender’s address, the date, the closing and the signature, are justified to the left-hand side of the page, this is known as modified blocking. Answer (d) is the correct answer
9.
Which of the following would you send a business letter to?
Aunt Julie
Nana Jasper
Professor Jonathan Thompson
Dad
Answers (a), (b) and (d) all refer to family members. They would receive an informal letter. Answer (c), Professor Jonathan Thompson, is to a teacher and would require a more formal business letter. Therefore, Answer (c) is the correct answer
10.
Which of the following names the correct parts to a formal business letter?
Sender’s address, date, salutation, body, closing, signature, P.S.
Sender’s address, date, recipient’s address, salutation, body, closing, signature
Sender’s address, date, recipient’s address, salutation, body, signature
Sender’s address, recipient’s address, salutation, body, closing
The parts of a formal business letter are the Sender’s Address, then the date, then the recipient’s address followed by the salutation and then the body of the letter. Next is the closing and finally the signature. Each of these is correctly shown in Answer (b)
Author:  Christine G. Broome

© Copyright 2016-2019 - Education Quizzes
TJS - Web Design Lincolnshire
View Printout in HTML

Valid HTML5

We use cookies to make your experience of our website better.

To comply with the new e-Privacy directive, we need to ask for your consent - I agree - No thanks - Find out more