Writing Numbers including Standard Form
You may be able to count a long way, but how are you with the really big numbers?

Writing Numbers including Standard Form

This Math quiz is called 'Writing Numbers including Standard Form' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

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Being able to read and write numbers means you have to have a good understanding of the place value chart. Writing a check still requires you to write the number out in words as well as in digits, to help avoid a careless mistake that could cost you. This middle school Math quiz will test how well you can recognize big numbers.

Because we usually see numbers written as digits, it takes a little extra brain power to write them down in words. In the past few years there have been some embarrassing mistakes by big companies, which have cost them thousands if not millions of dollars, all over a simple mistake in entering a number into a spreadsheet. Basic proof-checking by a colleague could easily have prevented these errors.

Britain had a different system than America (and perhaps the rest of the world) to name very big numbers such as 1 billion. The old British system would require 1 million million to become 1 billion (i.e. 12 zeroes), but the more logical system now adopted by the world (or most of the world) is to use 1 thousand million for 1 billion (9 zeroes). Numbers are all getting very big by then, so a better way to write them is to use Scientific Notation.

When writing very large numbers, group them into threes, starting from the units digit. Using a comma to separate thousands is not agreed international practice, a space is recommended (this is because many other countries use a comma for their decimal). You will notice that we continue to use commas - this is for layout purposes only.

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Author:  Sally Thompson

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