Basic Anatomy - The Skeleton

Where would we be without our bones?

Basic Anatomy - The Skeleton

This Science quiz is called 'Basic Anatomy - The Skeleton' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at middle school. Playing educational quizzes is a fabulous way to learn if you are in the 6th, 7th or 8th grade - aged 11 to 14.

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The skeleton is the bone structure within the body that supports the body and allows it to withstand movement. It also produces blood cells and stores minerals. When a person is born, they have a total of 270 different bones. However, as a person grows, many of those bones fuse together so that by late childhood/early adulthood the bone total drops to 206.

Bones contain mass (density) but do not reach their full mass capacity until a person reaches the age of 30.

The longest bone in the body is the femur. The femur is the thigh bone. The smallest bone is inside the ear and is called the stirrup.

Each hand has a total of 26 bones. Only the nose and outer ears do not have bones. Rather they have cartilages. A cartilage has more flexibility than does bone but is still quite sturdy. So no one can break a nose bone but rather can they can tear the nose cartilage.

The skeleton bones in the body are connected to each other at joints. Joints can be fixed joints such as the skull, hinged joints such as the fingers and toes, and ball-and-socket joints such as the shoulders and hips.

The skeleton of males and females do differ. In fact, archaeologists and orthopedics, both of whom study bones, can tell by simply looking at a skeleton whether the person was a female or a male. They can even determine an approximate age by simply looking at the bones. In males, the arm bones and leg bones are longer and thicker where in females the pelvic bone is wider, having a larger space through which babies are born.

Although there are 206 different bones, for this quiz will only cover the main ones. Among the main bones are the following. See below.

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Skull: The skull protects the brain and supports the soft tissue of the head. (It contains 22 bones.)

Maxilla: The maxilla is an irregular shaped bone that makes up the upper portion of the jaw.

Mandible: The mandible is also known as the jaw bone.

Clavicle: The clavicle is also known as the collarbone. It consists of a pair of long bones that connect the scapula to the sternum.

Vertebra: The vertebra is also known as the spinal column.

Scapula: The scapula is also known as the shoulder blade and it articulates with the humerus. It is a triangular, flat bone.

Sternum: The sternum is also known as the breastbone. It is a long, narrow and flat bone that is the keystone to the rib cage. It also helps to stabilize the thoracic skeleton.

Ribs: The ribs are long curved bones which form a cage that protects the organs found in the chest.

Humerus: The humerus is the largest bone in the upper part of the arm. Radius: The radius is the shorter of two long bones that are found in the lower part of the arm.

Pelvis: The pelvis is the bone that connects the base of the spine with the legs.

Ulna: The ulna is the longer of the two bones that are found in the lower part of the arm.

Sacrum: The sacrum is part of the vertebra. It is wedge shaped and rests at the end of the spine where it intersects with the hip bones to form the pelvis.

Metacarpals: The metacarpals make up the knuckles on the hands.

Phalanges: Phalanges are the bones that exist in each finger and each toe. In total, there are 56 phalanges with 14 in each hand.

Femur: The femur is the thigh bone and it is the longest, strongest and heaviest bone of the human body.

Patella: The patella is also known as the kneecap.

Tibia: The tibia is also known as the shin bone. The lower half of the leg contains two long bones. The tibia is the thicker of the two where the fibula is the thinner.

Fibula: The fibula is a long, thin bone of the lower half of the leg. It runs parallel to the tibia.

Tarsals and Metatarsals: Tarsals and metatarsals are bones found in the foot.

Well, that was quite a list of the bones. Take some time to study this list carefully and see if you can locate the bones on your own body. Then when you feel like you can name each bone successfully, move on to the ten questions below and see how many of them you can find the right answer for.
1.
This is the bone that connects the base of the spine with the legs.
Sacrum
Tarsal
Pelvis
Sternum
The pelvis is the bone that connects the base of the spine with the legs. Answer (c) is correct
2.
This is also known as the collarbone.
Sacrum
Sternum
Clavicle
Ulna
The clavicle is also known as the collarbone. Answer (c) is correct
3.
This is also known as the kneecap.
Radius
Humerus
Scapula
Patella
The patella is also known as the kneecap. Answer (d) is correct
4.
This is also known as the jaw bone.
Mandible
Tibia
Fibula
Maxilla
The mandible is also known as the jaw bone. Answer (a) is correct
5.
Fingers and toes have what kind of joints?
Slip joints
Hinged joints
Fixed joints
Ball-and-socket joints
The fingers and toes have hinged joints. Answer (b) is correct
6.
People are born with how many bones?
206
270
300
56
People are born with 270 bones. During growth, some of the bones fuse so that eventually the body contains 206 bones. Answer (b) “270” is correct
7.
This is also known as the spinal column.
Vertebra
Fibula
Metacarpal
Ulna
The vertebra is also known as the spinal column. Answer (a) is correct
8.
This protects the brain and supports the soft tissue of the head.
Vertebra
Skull
Clavicle
Phalanges
The skull protects the brain and supports the soft tissue of the head. Answer (b) is correct
9.
This is also known as the breastbone.
Patella
Scapula
Sacrum
Sternum
The sternum is also known as the breastbone. Answer (d) is correct
10.
The smallest bone is inside the ear and it is called the _____.
stirrup
femur
tibia
maxilla
The smallest bone is inside the ear and it is called the stirrup. Answer (a) is correct
Author:  Christine G. Broome

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