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To Kill a Mockingbird - Dialogue
We said we wouldn't hurt him and we'd buy him an ice-cream.

To Kill a Mockingbird - Dialogue

This Literature quiz is called 'To Kill a Mockingbird - Dialogue' and it has been written by teachers to help you if you are studying the subject at senior high school. Playing educational quizzes is one of the most efficienct ways to learn if you are in the 11th or 12th grade - aged 16 to 18.

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This senior high school English Literature quiz tests you on dialog in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. The term “dialogue” is used for any direct speech in literature, although technically it means a conversation between at least two people. Dialog is an important element in characterisation. A character’s speech, both in its style and in its content, has much to teach the reader. Several of the characters in To Kill a Mockingbird are strongly characterized through their dialog, with all speaking in dialect to a greater or lesser extent, although these dialects vary, most significantly by the class or race of the person speaking. Atticus often corrects Scout’s use of dialect, describing some words as “common”.

1.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"We're askin' him real politely to come out sometimes, and tell us what he does in there — we said we wouldn't hurt him and we'd buy him an ice-cream."
Dill
Jem
Scout
Francis
Jem credits Dill with first coming up with the idea of making Boo Radley come out of his house
2.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"Because — he — is — trash, that's why you can't play with him. I'll not have you around him, picking up his habits and learning Lord-knows-what."
Atticus
Aunt Alexandra
Miss Caroline
Miss Maudie
Aunt Alexandra divides the world into those who are socially acceptable and those to be looked down upon and pitied
3.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"There's some folks who don't eat like us, but you ain't called on to contradict 'em at the table when they don't."
Miss Maudie
Jem
Atticus
Calpurnia
Calpurnia sees it as her responsibility to ensure that Scout is raised with good manners
4.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"The thing about it is, our kind of folks don't like the Cunninghams, the Cunninghams don't like the Ewells, and the Ewells hate and despise the colored folks."
Scout
Dill
Aunt Alexandra
Jem
Jem sees the link between class prejudice and racism, imagining it as a hierarchy of dislike and distrust in which groups of people need to feel superior to another group of people. Jem understands that advantages can be passed down through the generations, whereas Scout argues that all people are essentially the same at birth
5.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"Miss Jean Louise, stand up. Your father's passin'."
Calpurnia
Reverend Sykes
Miss Maudie
Mr Gilmer
Pay attention to the use of titles in To Kill a Mockingbird. The Judge refers to Calpurnia by her first name, in a familiar way, although he doesn't really know her, while Reverend Sykes addresses Scout very formally, although he is an adult and she a child. Mayella is not used to anyone addressing her as "Miss" before she goes to court
6.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"You're real nice, Uncle Jack, an' I reckon I love you even after what you did, but you don't understand children much."
Jem
Dill
Scout
Walter Cunningham
Scout is not afraid to speak her mind, even to adults
7.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"I was wonderin' why it was so quiet like, an' it come to me that there weren't a chile on the place, not a one of 'em."
Scout
Dill
Tom Robinson
Calpurnia
The reader hears very little of Tom's speech, although the plot of the novel revolves around his trial
8.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"Before I can live with other folks I've got to live with myself. The one thing that doesn't abide by majority rule is a person's conscience."
Scout
Calpurnia
Atticus
Tom Robinson
Atticus teaches his children the importance of obeying their consciences
9.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"It's never an insult to be called what somebody thinks is a bad name. It just shows you how poor that person is, it doesn't hurt you."
Reverend Sykes
Atticus
Calpurnia
Miss Maudie
Atticus raises his children to be courageous, and to stand up for their beliefs, even when those beliefs are opposed by the majority of people
10.
Match the dialog to the correct speaker.

"You are too young to understand it, but sometimes the Bible in the hand of one man is worse than a whisky bottle in the hand of — oh, of your father."
Miss Maudie
Calpurnia
Mrs Dubose
Reverend Sykes
Miss Maudie explains to Scout that religion can be a more dangerous excuse for terrible behavior than drunkenness might be
Author:  Sheri Smith

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