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Reading Comprehension 13 - Inference and Conclusions 2
The Festival of Sails is the largest annual keel boat regatta in the Southern Hemisphere.

Reading Comprehension 13 - Inference and Conclusions 2

In the previous Upper Primary English quiz we looked at inference and conclusions in reading comprehension. This quiz continues on the same theme.

We are confronted with many passages when we read books, articles and letters. We need to understand what the writer is trying to communicate. Sometimes it is not possible for the writer to exactly say everything in black and white like a legal document. So, both the writer and the reader to whom the writing is aimed at would need to have some common bench marks which are set over a period of time.

If an author is writing a romance story he would empathise with a reader who likes romance stories and write accordingly by using situations and language suitable to that genre of stories. When a reader who is not a romance lover tries to read the book he may miss out on the author’s point of view, whereas a lover of romance stories would enjoy it better. Likewise, a thriller writer would use lots of action and suspense in his stories which would interest a lover of thrillers. Another example is the setting of a story where Independence Day is celebrated. Here, if you are writing to an Indian audience Independence Day would be August 15th whereas for an American audience it would relate to July 4th.

In a passage the writer gives a lot of clues and the reader utilises these clues to enhance his reading pleasure. In understanding the passage the reader delves into his own knowledge base and learning experience and applies them to draw a conclusion and make an inference.

Reading comprehension abilities can be fine tuned with experience and voracious reading. In order to hone your skills at reading comprehension read the passage that follows and answer the questions that are asked based on the passage. See how well you do with inference and conclusions!
The Festival of Sails in Australia.

The Festival of Sails is touted as the largest annual keel boat regatta in the Southern Hemisphere. But what is a regatta and what is a keel boat?

A popular dictionary lists the following three meanings of regatta: a boat race, as of rowboats, yachts, or other vessels; an organised series of such races; (originally) a gondola race in Venice.

The same dictionary gives the meaning for a keel boat as: a roughly built, shallow freight boat, having a keel to permit sailing into the wind.

Believe me, the Festival of Sails is nothing as staid as the definitions given by the dictionary!

Imagine other forms of racing you have witnessed or heard of like Formula 1 or the Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix. You will have heard of Usain Bolt running the 100 meters sprint in record time. Motor racing is the coming together of a superbly engineered car and the driving skills of the driver, but the keel boat regatta is probably the only race which utilises nature in its entirety (apart from runners like Usain Bolt). The humans who navigate the keel boat are just humans. The water is natural as it is available in its natural habitat at the waterfront of Corio Bay, Geelong. The wind is again nature and available as nature allows us to have it. Probably, the only man made element in the race is the keel boat and there is no engine in the boat. The boat is designed to reduce air resistance and water resistance. The sails designed to catch the wind and propel the craft over the water.

If you are the outdoor type then you have seen nothing if you have not witnessed a keel boat race. The Festival of Sails is one of the oldest races in Australia, having commenced in 1844, and as an annual event, it has a history that is much older than the more popular events such as the America’s Cup in 1851 or the Melbourne Cup in 1861. The first Festival of Sails was held much earlier than Australia’s Ashes win in 1891-92 or the Davis Cup in 1900.

Since Australia is blessed with a fascinating coast line it is almost impossible for any youngster not to be exposed to the sporting activities around the coast related to the sea, wind and boats. The Festival of Sails offers youngsters and oldies, from the ages of 5 to 90, an opportunity to experience nature at its best. The Royal Geelong Yacht Club hosts the Festival of Sails every year for three days with the finale on Australia Day. The club promotes sailing in a big way and particularly lays emphasis on youth and ladies.
1.
Why does the writer use the phrase, 'Believe me, the Festival of Sails is nothing as staid as the definitions given by the dictionary'?
Because the Festival of Sails is an event that involves a keel boat and an opportunity for people to experience nature at its best.
Because the Festival of Sails is an event not as demanding as a Formula 1 race.
Because the Festival of Sails is an event not as demanding as the Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix.
Because the Festival of Sails is an event that does not test the limits of machines.
The Festival of Sails is a regatta involving keel boats navigated by humans utilising the power of wind on the sea coast. The race involves the creation of a keel boat which is then sailed by highly skilled humans who grapple with the vagaries of nature. The writer is convinced that the dictionary definition is too matter of fact and does not convey the dynamism involved with the regatta
2.
Why does the writer compare a keel boat regatta with Usain Bolt?
Because they are not comparable.
Because Usain Bolt comes from Jamaica.
Because keel boats use bolts to secure the boat.
Because both involve the skill of human beings.
Both involve the skill of human beings competing in a race. In the case of Usain Bolt, the legendary sprinter, he uses his body and mind to propel himself at a speed unimaginable for ordinary human beings. Similarly, the keel boat regatta involves the creation of a keel boat that minimises wind resistance, and then sailing the boats utilising well crafted sails, the crew's skills and the wind to race across the coast
3.
What inference can you draw about the status of Festival of Sails in the pantheon of popular sports?
The Festival of Sails is not as much fun as other sports.
The Festival of Sails is older than the more popular sports.
The Festival of Sails is not a race of skill.
The Festival of Sails is not popular because most other countries do not have coast lines.
The Festival of Sails is older than the more popular sports having commenced in the year 1844. The other listed events commenced much later, including ones in such popular games as cricket and tennis
4.
Can the keel boat regatta be considered a spectator sport?
No, it is not a spectator sport.
It is a sport enjoyed only by youngsters.
Yes, it is a spectator sport.
It is a sport enjoyed only by older people.
Yes, it is a spectator sport that is watched by thousands of spectators. It is a popular sport in Australia. The regatta is watched by young and old alike
5.
How do you think the keel boats move without an engine?
By the rowing of humans.
By humans blowing on the sails.
By the waves on the water.
Keel boats move by trapping the wind with the help of sails.
The keel boats have sails which help to trap wind that blows across the sea
6.
Why is the keel boat regatta called the Festival of Sails?
Because it celebrates the joy of sailing.
Because Australia likes festivals.
Because the government calls it so.
Because the people of Australia want it so.
A festival is a series of special events organised in one place and the Festival of Sails is an event for keel boat racing
7.
Can you compare the Festival of Sails with other important events?
No, because it does not involve machines.
No, because it is on water.
Yes, because it is a mass spectator sporting event, as are other tournaments.
No, because it depends only on nature.
The Festival of Sails is a mass spectator sporting event and can be compared to other tournaments such as F1 racing or the Motorcycle Grand Prix
8.
Why is Australia considered to be good for events such as the Festival of Sails?
Because it has a population of 22 million.
Because it has a fascinating coastline suitable for water sporting events.
Because it competes with cricket and motor racing.
Because it wants to celebrate Australia Day.
Australia is blessed with a good coast line that is suitable for water sports such as a keel boat regatta or wind-surfing
9.
What can be inferred from the phrase 'it is almost impossible for any youngster not to be exposed to the sporting activities around the coast'?
That rich Australian parents want to spend their wealth on children.
That the government provides incentives.
That children want to show off their sailing skills.
That Australia has a good coast line where sporting activities related to water are promoted in a big way.
Australia's good coast line is conducive for sporting activities related to water to be undertaken and parents cannot ignore the fascination of the water and the many sporting activities that are undertaken there. Thus, children are exposed to activities around water right from their childhood
10.
Why should keel boats be designed in a particular way?
They should be designed to minimise wind and water resistance.
They should be designed to carry lots of sails.
They should be designed so that they are fit for kids aged 5 and below.
They should be designed so that they are fit for older people aged 90 and above.
A keel boat regatta tests the skill of the sailor who uses the natural wind energy to speed his keel boat and in order to overcome resistance from wind and water. Boats are designed in such a way that they offer the least resistance to wind and water
Author:  V T Narendra

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