Orange clock showing 4:00 on green background
Have you got time to play this difficult Time quiz?

Time 2 (Difficult)

Welcome to the second quiz in our Difficult Eleven Plus maths series on solving problems involving Time. There are many different units of time, which I’m sure you are familiar with, like seconds, minutes, hours and days. Would you like to know a few more? Then take a look at these:

  • Myriosecond – one ten-thousandth of a second
  • Millisecond – one thousandth of a second
  • Centisecond – one hundredth of a second
  • Lunar month – 29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes and 3 seconds
  • Biennium – 2 years
  • Lustrum – 5 years
  • Gigasecond – 1 billion seconds (roughly 31.7 years)

You’ll be happy to hear that you don’t need to know any of these terms just yet. It’s always good to learn new things though, and one way to do that is to play this quiz!

1.
How many fortnights are there in a year?
14 fortnights
26 fortnights
52 fortnights
365 fortnights
There are 52 weeks in a year and a fortnight lasts for 2 weeks. So, to find the answer we divide 52 by 2: 52 ÷2 = 26
2.
Which of these is the same as 8,784 hours?
A 31 day month
A 30 day month
A 365 day year
A leap year
There are 24 hours in a day, so 8,784 ÷ 24 = 366, the number of days in a leap year
3.
The time is twenty past midnight, but Jane’s watch says 23:06. How fast or slow is Jane’s watch?
12 hours and 14 minutes slow
11 hours and 46 minutes fast
1 hour and 14 minutes slow
46 minutes fast
23:06 is 54 minutes before midnight (00:00). Twenty past midnight is 00:20 so we need to add another 20 minutes: 54 + 20 = 74
There are 60 minutes in an hour, so we subtract 60 from 74 to get 14. Jane’s watch is 1 hour and 14 minutes slow
4.
The train from London to Edinburgh leaves at 06:08 and arrives at 11:02. How many minutes does the journey take?
300 minutes
294 minutes
286 minutes
280 minutes
06:08 to 07:00 is 52 minutes. 07:00 to 11:00 is 4 hours, or 240 minutes (4 x 60 = 240). 11:00 to 11:02 s 2 minutes.
52 + 240 + 2 = 294
5.
How many leap years were there in the 19th century?
26 leap years
25 leap years
24 leap years
23 leap years
The 19th century was the years from 1801 to 1900 inclusive. To be a leap year, the year must be divisible by 4. There were 25 years in the 19th century which are divisible by 4. However, years ending in 00 (like 1900) must also be divisible by 400. 1900 is not divisible by 400 so was not a leap year. 2000 is divisible by 400 so that was a leap year
6.
How many revolutions (complete turns) does the hour hand of a clock turn through in one week?
7 revolutions
14 revolutions
84 revolutions
168 revolutions
The hour hand of a clock turns through one complete revolution every 12 hours, that’s twice in one day. There are 7 days in a week so to work this out we multiply 7 by 2: 7 x 2 = 14
7.
How many revolutions (complete turns) does the second hand of a clock turn through in 1 week?
10,080 revolutions
36,000 revolutions
240,080 revolutions
604,800 revolutions
It goes round once for every minute. There are 60 minutes in an hour, so that's 1 × 60 = 60 revolutions an hour. There are 24 hours in a day, so there are 24 × 60 = 1,440 revolutions in a day. There are 7 days in a week, so there are 1,440 x 7 = 10,080 revolutions in a week
8.
Susan left for work at 06:13. She walked to the bus stop which took 18 minutes, the she had to wait 2 minutes for the bus to arrive. The journey on the bus lasted for 25 minutes and then Susan walked for another 12 minutes before she got to work 20 minutes early.
What time did Susan start work?
7:30 am
7:20 am
7:10 am
7:00 am
Susan’s walk to the bus stop took 18 minutes. 06:13 + 18 = 06:31
She waited 2 minutes for her bus to arrive. 06:31 + 2 = 06:33
The bus journey lasted 25 minutes. 06:33 + 25 = 06:58
She then walked for 12 minutes. 06:58 + 12 = 07:10
Susan arrived 20 minutes early. 07:10 + 20 = 07:30. Susan started work at 07:30, or 7:30 am
9.
How many twenty-minute periods are there in a day?
24
36
48
72
There are three twenty-minute periods in one hour, and 24 hours in a day. So, to find the answer we multiply 3 by 24: 3 x 24 = 72
10.
Which millennium are we living in?
The 2nd millennium
The 20th millennium
The 3rd millennium
The 21st millennium
The first millennium lasted from 1 CE to 1000 CE. The second lasted from 1001 to 2000. The third millennium began in 2001 and will end in the year 3000
Author:  Frank Evans

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