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Tough Enough? - Medium Frequency Words
How could you let yourself be deceived into believing you would receive a million pounds?

Tough Enough? - Medium Frequency Words

Quiz playing is a wonderful way to increase your knowledge of English as a Second Language. Remember that all of our ESL quizzes have titles that are both friendly and technical at the same time… In the case of this quiz you might like to tell your friends about “Tough Enough?” but no doubt your teachers will talk about the “Medium Frequency Words quiz”! If you hear a technical term and you want to find a quiz about the subject then just look through the list of quiz titles until you find what you need.

Medium frequency words are the words that appear most often in printed materials

This quiz offers you a selection of medium frequency words (and a bit of punctuation). Let's see whether they are 'tough enough' for you, or indeed whether you are tough enough for them!

1.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
A classic English cream tea consists of a scone with cream and a spoonful of fresh strawberry jam, plus of course a pot of tea with milk and sugar: on a summer's afternoon, perhaps on the lawn of a country pub and while you're enjoying a pretty view of the landscape, it's beautiful!
A classic English cream tea consists of a skone with cream and a spoonfull of fresh strawbery jam, plus of course a pot of tea with milk and sugar: on a summers afternoon, perhaps on the lorn of a contry pub and while you're enjoying a pritty view of the landscape, its beautiful!
A classic English cream tea consists of a scoan with cream and a spoonful of fresh stawberry jam, plus of coarse a pot of tea with milk and sugar: on a summers afternoon, perhaps on the laun of a country pub and while your enjoying a pritty view of the landscape, its beatifull!
A classic English cream tea consists of a scone with cream and a spoonfull of fresh strawbury jam, plus of corse a pot of tea with milk and sugar: on a summers' afternoon, perhaps on the lawn of a cuntry pub and while your enjoying a pretty view of the landscape, its' beutifull!
Only Version 1 is fully correct; the details 'went downhill' in the later Answers!
The words we hoped you would check include: 'scone' (which may be pronounced as 'skon' or 'scoan'); 'spoonful' and 'beautiful' (with only one final L), 'course' (not the same as 'coarse', which means 'rough, or unrefined'), 'lawn' and 'pretty' (spelt with an E, although it doesn't sound like it).
Also be careful (!) about the use of the apostrophe in 'summer's'' (possessive; = 'of the summer') and 'it's' (short for 'it is').
2.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
When the bomb was thrown through the window of the throne-room, the Royal Guard went out to find out who had thrown it.
When the bom was throne threw the window of the thrown-room, the Royal Guard went out to find out who had throne it.
Wen the bom was throne threw the windo of the thron-room, the Royal Guard went out to found out how had throwne it.
Wen the bom was trone throw the windough of the thrown-room, the Royal Guard went out to fond out how had threwn it.
The main words here are the verb 'throw' (past: 'threw; thrown') and 'through'.
A Throne is the official seat where a king or queen would sit. We also use it to represent the monarchy as an institution, and those people who have been monarch ('the history of the British Throne', etc.)
3.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
How could you let yourself be decieved into believing you would recieve a million pounds?
How could you let yourself be deceived into believing you would receive a million pounds?
How could you let yourself be decieved into beleiving you would recieve a million pounds?
How could you let yourself be decieved into beleiving you would receive a million pounds?
As the old rhyme says: ' I before E, except after C ' !
4.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
Under the chrismas trea wer eigth boxs', all tyed up with sting.
Under the christmas tree wer eigth boxes', all tied up with spring.
Under the chrismus trea wer eigth box's, awl ty'd up with scring.
Under the Christmas tree were eight boxes, all tied up with string.
Watch the correct spelling of 'Christmas' (with capital initial, and quite a lot of consonants, representing 'Christ's-mas' ~ i.e. a festival related to Jesus Christ); 'eight' (a common but rather irregular word), the plural of 'box' ( = 'boxes'), the past form of verbs in -ie ('die => died ; 'tie => tied' ; 'cry = cried', 'spy => spied' etc.), and the correct consonant group on the front of 'string'. (Check the other last words too, apart from 'scring' ~ which we invented!)
5.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
The frunt of each of these draws is made with a lair of real would.
The front of each of these drawers is made with a layer of real wood.
The frunt of eech of these draws is maid with a lair of reel would.
The frunt of eash of theese drows is mad with a liar of reel would.
'Front' is pronounced as though with a 'u' (like 'the fox is at the front of the hunt'); the sliding parts of a piece of furniture are 'drawers' ('things that can be pulled/drawn'), although usually pronounced shorter, like 'draws'. Check the difference between 'made' and 'maid' (= a young girl working in domestic service), and 'layer' (slightly like 'drawer' in the shape of the word); 'reel' is not the same as 'real' (though once again, they sound much alike), and 'would' and 'wood' are perhaps an unhelpful pair too.
6.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
The selekshun of kitens and pupy's in the petshop was realy georgious.
The selection of kittens and puppies in the pet shop was really gorgeous.
The sellection of kittens' and puppies' in the pet shop was relly gorgious.
The sellexion of kitton's and pupys' in the pet shop was really gorgous.
If you compare 'like with like' between Answer 2 and the other versions, you should see which the correct spellings are, and (we hope) why.
Remember we do not use apostrophes in the plural (unless there is 'ownership', which is not the case here).
7.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
When you here the bell clanging, it means the students are changeing lessons ~ in subjects ranging from Astronomy to Zoology.
When you hear the bell clanging, it means the students are changing lessons ~ in subjects ranging from Astronomy to Zoology.
When you here the bell clanging, it means the students are changeing lesons ~ in subjects rangeing from Astronomy to Zoology.
When you hear the bell clangeing, it means the students are changing lesons ~ in subjects rangeing from Astromony to Zology.
The point here is about verbs ending in -G. We do not usually put an E into such forms as 'changing' (though we do write 'singeing' [from 'to singe', = to burn the surface of something, probably by accident], to distinguish to from 'singing' [= making music with one's voice]).
So, while it may look as though 'clanging' and 'ranging' should rhyme with each other, in fact they do not ('clang-ing', but 'rain-jing').
8.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
His wollit, with there packit of tickits, must of fell out of his pockit and onto the carpit.
His walit, with their packit of tickits, must have fell out of his pockit and onto the carpit.
His wallet, with their packet of tickets, must have fallen out of his pocket and onto the carpet.
His walet, with there packet of ticket's, must of fallen out of his pockit and onto the carpit.
Most of the problems in this one are to do with vowels that may not sound the way they look (e.g. 'wallet', pronounced more like the phonetic spelling in Answer 1).
On the whole the Answers improve until the (correct) No.3, then they get worse again.
Be careful of the difference between 'their' ( = belonging to them ) and 'there' ( = in that place ) which are both common and sound alike, but are not spelt the same.
Also beware that the packet ' ... must HAVE fallen ... ' (NOT 'must of ...', which it sounds very like, but which does not make coherent sense. Many native English speakers are unclear on this point and spell it the wrong way; but think carefully about how the phrase is built, and you should then never be able to get it wrong! ('I have done Thing A, but I could HAVE done Thing B.')
9.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
Two diferences from the Catholic Church are that a Church of England preest is aloud to be marrid, and that many Anglican preest's are themselves women.
Two differences from the Catholic Church are that a Church of England priest is allowed to be married, and that many Anglican priests are themselves women.
To differances from the Catholic Chuch are that a Chuch of England priest is allowed to be marryd, and that meny Anglican priests' are themselves womin.
Too differences from the Catholic Church are that a Church of England priest is aloud to be marry'd, and that meny Anglican priests are themselves wimin.
Points to watch here:
'Two' ( = 2 ) is not the same as 'to' or 'too' ; check the spelling of 'differences', 'church', 'priest', the past form 'married' (from a verb originally ending in Y), and the somewhat misleading vowels in 'many' and 'women'.
Also watch those apostrophes again ... there is no suggestion of possession in 'priests' here.
10.
Which is the only fully correct version of this sentence?
I'm afrayed the wether isnt looking very brite for this arfternon.
I'm afraid the weather isn't looking very bright for this afternoon.
Im afreid the wethar isnt looking very brygt for this afternun.
Im afrade the whether isnt' looking very brigth for this aftarnoon.
The main traps here were apostrophes, and the spelling of 'bright' and 'weather' (two words that may not go together very often in Britain!).
Author:  Ian Miles

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