UKUK USUSIndiaIndia
Fun Learning and Revision for KS1, KS2, 11-Plus, KS3 and GCSE
Join Us
Autumn forest with sunlight through trees
Read the passage and then answer the ten questions on DNA.

DNA - Extract 2

This is the second of two GCSE English Literature extract questions for DNA by Dennis Kelly. It takes place near the beginning of Act Three, in the scene following Jan’s and Mark’s conversation in “A Street”. The extract presents a typical conversation between Leah and Phil, one which might be more accurately described as a monologue because of Phil’s unresponsiveness. In it, Leah discusses the remarkable changes she has noticed in the community since Adam’s disappearance, initially attributing the positive effects to Phil’s decisive intervention after the accident. She quickly changes tone, however, after failing to get a response from Phil.

How to answer an extract question in an exam

The most important thing you can do when preparing to answer an extract question is to read the passage through more than once.

The first reading will enable you to understand the passage, especially in terms of the question you will answer. Consider specifically how the passage relates to the question. During the second reading, you can begin to make annotations, underlining those details you plan to discuss, or use as evidence, in your writing. It is a very good habit to read extract passages more than once, especially when you devote each reading to a specific aim. After your initial preparation, plan in greater detail how you can use the passage to answer the question.

Try to spare a moment or two to consider the reason this particular extract might have been chosen. What is its significance to the overall text? How would you describe its importance? Which of the text’s themes does it touch upon or develop? Can you describe how the experiences of each of the characters differ? How does the extract relate to the events which follow; for example, can you point to any evidence of foreshadowing, or perhaps a turning point? Think about the point where the extract ends: is the final line significant? How does the extract’s ending relate to the events or themes of the text?

Be sure to consider the exact requirements of the question you are expected to answer. What are the specifics you have been asked to address? An extract question might concern any aspect of the writing, including mood and atmosphere, character, dialogue, theme, or, sometimes, your own personal response. Begin by explaining the passage’s immediate context: describe what has happened before the events in the extract, showing how this is relevant to the passage. Always discuss the passage itself in detail, rather than writing in a general way about the text and its themes. Plan out your answer before you begin, grouping related ideas together. A plan is never a waste of time! Make sure you pace yourself so that you are able to cover the entire passage.

Read the extract below carefully before answering the questions.

Did you know...

You can play all the teacher-written quizzes on our site for just £9.95 per month. Click the button to sign up or read more.

Sign up here
Go straight to Quiz

LEAH sags. She drops her suitcase and sits with PHIL.

Did you see Jan at Adam’s memorial? Floods of tears. It was wonderful, everyone felt wonderful, I felt terrible of course, but everyone felt wonderful. It’s incredible. The change. This place. You’re a miracle worker. Everyone’s happy. You know that? You notice that? Cathy was on the telly. Used that clip on every channel. She’s like a celebrity, there are second years asking for her autograph. Suddenly Adam’s everyone’s best friend. Richard’s named his dog Adam. Mark’s mum says if her baby’s a boy she’s going to call him Adam. Funny thing is they’re all actually behaving better as well. I saw Jan helping a first year find the gym. Mark’s been doing charity work, for Christ’s sake. Maybe being seen as heroes is making them behave like heroes.

PHIL considers his waffle. Decides it needs more jam.

Yeah, everyone happy. Well it’s not all roses, you know. Brian’s on medication. Did you know that? Phil? Did you know that they’ve put Brian on medication?

No answer.

Yep, Brian’s off his head, John Tate hasn’t been seen in weeks, and the postman’s facing the rest of his life in prison, but, you know, omelettes and eggs, as long as you’ve your waffle, who cares.

How do you feel?

PHIL turns to her.

Considers.

For a long time.

Opens his mouth to answer

Stops.

Shrugs and goes back to his waffle.

LEAH stares at him.

I admire you so much.

The waffle is ready. PHIL looks pleased.

JAN and MARK enter.

JAN: You better come with us.

MARK: You really better come with us.

LEAH: What is it?

Beat.

JAN: You really, really better come with us.

LEAH goes with JAN and MARK.

PHIL looks at his waffle, looks after JAN, MARK and LEAH, then back at the waffle. Irritated he puts it carefully away.

* * *

A Wood. CATHY, BRIAN, PHIL, LEAH, MARK, LOU and JAN.

They stand around a BOY who looks like a tramp. His clothes are torn and dirty and his hair is matted with dried blood from an old gash on his forehead that has not been cleaned up. He stands there, twitchily, staring at them as though they were aliens and it looks as though he might run off at any moment.

Finally PHIL speaks.

PHIL: Hello Adam.

ADAM: Alright.

Pause.

CATHY: We found him up there, up the hill

BRIAN: I found him

CATHY: Living in a hedge

BRIAN: a hedge, I found him, I found him, I found Adam living in a hedge, I found him

CATHY: It’s like this hedge complex he’s made, you have to crawl to get in

BRIAN: I crawled, I love crawling, I love crawling, Leah

CATHY: Like a warren in this hedge and he’s dragged bits of cardboard and rags to make it better, more waterproof

BRIAN: I loved it, Leah, it was like a hideout.

CATHY: He’s been living in there.

BRIAN: Living, she was shouting at me to get off the ground, but I love the ground, don’t you like the ground?

CATHY: He was hiding away at the back.

BRIAN: D’you ever feel like the trees are watching you?

CATHY: Terrified.

ADAM: No I wasn’t.

Dennis Kelly, DNA (Oberon Books, 2012)
1.
Which of the following does Adam insist he was not feeling?
Terror
Shame
Anger
Depression
Cathy completes her tale ambiguously with the word "terrified", describing Adam's response to being discovered, but possibly also referring to Brian, who feels himself being watched by the trees
2.
Why are there no full stops after Cathy's and Brian's speech while they tell the others how they found Adam?
The lack of punctuation indicates that this portion of the play is meant to be slowed down
The lack of punctuation shows that Cathy and Brian are interrupting one another
The lack of punctuation demonstrates that Cathy and Brian are reluctant to explain themselves
Dennis Kelly forgot to punctuate these lines
Cathy and Brian interrupt one another in a breathless manner. Are they competing to take the credit for the discovery or are they collaborating? What do you think?
3.
Adam denies that he was terrified while living in the woods. Which of the following is NOT correct?
Adam's denial makes him sound like a young child who insists he is not afraid of something which ought to scare him
Adam's denial emphasises how the woods have been a place of safety for him in a way human society has not been
Adam's denial of fear might foreshadow the terror he will feel when Brian and Cathy kill him
Adam's denial demonstrates that he has forgotten everything about his past life
The natural environment of the woods has sustained and protected Adam to some extent, especially in comparison with the group and the murderous intentions of Phil and Cathy
4.
The order of events encourages the audience to see which of the following as the reason Phil goes to the woods in this scene?
Phil eventually decides to go to the woods because Jan is very persuasive
Phil eventually decides to go to the woods because Mark is very persuasive
Phil eventually decides to go to the woods because Leah has gone there
Phil eventually decides to go to the woods when he realises he does not want his waffle anyway
Despite Mark's "really" and Jan's "really, really", Phil only follows them to the woods once Leah has decided to go. His irritation at not being able to eat his waffle demonstrates his reluctance to follow
5.
What is the immediate context for this passage?
Cathy, Mark and Danny have just framed an innocent man
The group has just agreed on a plan to frame someone for Adam's disappearance
Leah has told Phil that she's running away
Phil and Cathy have just silently agreed to get rid of Adam
Leah threatens to run away only to give up when she can't get a response from Phil
6.
What immediately follows this passage?
Adam talks about how he has been surviving in the woods
Leah finally leaves Phil
Cathy, Mark and Danny collect DNA from an innocent man at the sorting office
Danny begins worrying again about getting into dentistry school
Adam's recount is hesitant and confused in parts
7.
BRIAN: I crawled, I love crawling, I love crawling, Leah

What shift is evident in this line?
Brian addresses Leah
Brian talks for the first time about enjoying being in the woods
Brian shows that he has suffered no ill effects from the actions the group has forced him to undertake
All of the above
Brian singles Leah out from the rest of the group as he talks about his desire to be close to the earth. Why might he choose to address Leah specifically?
8.
Which of the following words used by Cathy compares Adam to a wild animal?
Hedge
Warren
Cardboard
Rags
A warren is inhabited by rabbits. Using the term emphasises Adam's vulnerability and introduces the idea that he shares similarities with an animal that is common prey
9.
In which of the following lines does Leah suddenly change her tone with Phil?
"The postman’s facing the rest of his life in prison, but, you know, omelettes and eggs"
"Did you know that they’ve put Brian on medication?"
"Well it’s not all roses, you know"
"Maybe being seen as heroes is making them behave like heroes"
Leah presents all the evidence for Phil being a "miracle worker" before listing the many terrible consequences of the staged explanation for Adam's disappearance
10.
A Wood. CATHY, BRIAN, PHIL, LEAH, MARK, LOU and JAN.

They stand around a BOY who looks like a tramp. His clothes are torn and dirty and his hair is matted with dried blood from an old gash on his forehead that has not been cleaned up. He stands there, twitchily, staring at them as though they were aliens and it looks as though he might run off at any moment.

Finally PHIL speaks.


What is the significance of the word "finally" here?
The word shows that the rest of the group had been waiting for Phil to take charge
The word shows that Phil is entirely comfortable with the turn of events
The word reminds the audience that Adam is afraid
The word demonstrates to the audience that the group is happy to see Adam alive
The entire group is surprised to discover that Adam is still alive. Quickly realising the implications for themselves and their schemes, they wait for Phil to take charge once again
Author:  Sheri Smith

© Copyright 2016-2018 - Education Quizzes
TJS - Web Design Lincolnshire

Valid HTML5

We use cookies to make your experience of our website better.

To comply with the new e-Privacy directive, we need to ask for your consent - I agree - No thanks - Find out more