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Using Evidence from the Text
See if you can get full marks in this informative quiz.

Using Evidence from the Text

Now that you are studying English at GCSE, you are expected to be able to use evidence from the text to support any point you make. It's not good enough to make unsupported statements or assertions about a text. In order to convince your reader (a teacher or examiner), you will need to provide proof, often in the form of quotes. This quiz helps you to revise the many ways you can present evidence from a text.

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1.
The reference to Bluebeard in Heaney's poem, 'Blackberry-Picking', ironically ...... the reader to see blackberry juice as blood, and the boys as murderers.
hints
invites
compares
indicates
2.
Which of the following does NOT correctly embed a quote?
'A fur, a rat-grey fungus' grows on the berries, devouring them as a pest would
Despite 'a fur, a rat-grey fungus' devouring the berries each year, the boy never stopped his hoarding
Describing a mould as 'a fur, a rat-grey fungus' makes the reader imagine it as a pest, like a rat
The poet writes 'a fur, a rat-grey fungus' meaning mould
3.
When writing an essay, in addition to providing quotes from the text, you should also...
tell the examiner when you read the text
provide quotes from friends
make a point of your own and explain how the quote supports your point
write several paragraphs about how the text makes you feel
Many teachers refer to this as P.E.E. (point, evidence, explain)
4.
Which of the following correctly embeds a quote from Seamus Heaney's poem, 'Blackberry-Picking'?
The hoarded blackberries rot, 'a fur, a rat-grey fungus' spoiling them and causing disappointment
A fur, a rat-grey fungus spoils the berries, disappointing the narrator yearly in his youth
Every year, the narrator was disappointed by the fungus which grew on his hoarded berries
The narrator expresses his sense of disappointment: 'a fur, a rat-grey fungus'
5.
Which of the following correctly introduces a quote from Norman MacCaig's poem, 'November Night, Edinburgh'?
In his first line, MacCaig evokes a sense of celebration. 'The night tinkles like ice in glasses'
The night tinkles likes ice in glasses: in this line, MacCaig evokes a sense of celebration
In his first line, MacCaig evokes a sense of celebration: 'The night tinkles like ice in glasses'
In his first line, the night tinkles like ice in glasses, MacCaig evokes a sense of celebration
To introduce a short quote, end your sentence with a colon and remember to place quotation marks around the quote
6.
'I met a traveller from an antique land / Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone / Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand, / Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, / And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, / Tell that its sculptor well those passions read' - From Percy Bysshe Shelley's poem, 'Ozymandias'. Which of the following does NOT use quotation marks correctly?
Although the statue's face has been destroyed, his 'frown' and 'sneer' survive intact
Ozymandias's 'sneer of cold command' is one of the few surviving features of his 'shattered visage'
Ozymandias surveys his lost kingdom with a 'sneer' of cold command
Despite his 'shattered visage', Ozymandias's 'frown' and 'sneer of cold command' survive
'Sneer of cold command' is the phrase quoted from the poem, so the quotation marks must go around the entire phrase
7.
Which of the following uses evidence from the text by paraphrasing?
'The new sense, the possible': this refers to lying
The narrator views the boy's first awareness of lying as an awakening to 'the new sense, the possible'
The narrator watches as a new world opens up to the boy: 'the new sense, the possible'
The boy learns about the opportunities available to him when lies become possible
For more practice with paraphrasing as a method of using evidence from the text, try our Paraphrasing quiz
8.
Which of the following correctly embeds a quote?
'Tinkles like ice in glasses': this repeats an 's' sound, reinforcing the crisp, frosty imagery
The repetition of the 's' sound in 'tinkles like ice in glasses' reinforces the crisp, frosty imagery
The crisp, frosty imagery is reinforced by the 's' sound in tinkles like ice in glasses
The repetition of the 's' sound in the first line reinforces the crisp, frosty imagery
'Embedding' a quote means that it appears naturally in the middle of your own sentence (with quotation marks, of course)
9.
Which of the following correctly embeds a quote from Shenagh Pugh's poem, 'The Beautiful Lie'?
'The new sense, the possible': this refers to lying
The narrator views the boy's first awareness of lying as an awakening to 'the new sense, the possible'
The narrator watches as a new world opens up to the boy: 'the new sense, the possible'
The boy learns about the opportunities available to him when lies become possible
A correctly-embedded quote will merge seamlessly into your own sentence.  If you write a full sentence, then place a colon followed by your quote, you are introducing the quote rather than embedding it
10.
McCaig's reference to lights which 'die into pits' ...... at a darker side to the city.
hints
invites
compares
indicates
Author:  Sheri Smith

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