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Colours
A colour wheel shows the relationships between different colours.

Colours

This quiz addresses the requirements of the National Curriculum KS1 in Art and Design for children aged 5, 6 and 7 in years 1 and 2. Specifically this quiz is aimed at the section dealing with understanding processes and techniques, and it focusses on colours.

As an introduction to artistic techniques, studying art and design often begins with a good understanding of colour. This learning may begin with understanding primary and secondary colours and progress to experimenting with colour mixing and working with complimentary and contrasting colours, before going on to look at different artistic techniques.

1.
A set of tints and shades of the same colour is also known as what?
A colour wheel
A paint palette
Monochrome
Quite dull
An example of this would be red, pink and white
2.
To make a colour darker, you can add which other paint?
White
Orange
Black
Pink
The new colour is then known as a shade of the original
3.
Orange, green and violet are known as what?
Secondary colours
Primary colours
High school colours
College colours
Secondary colours are made by mixing two of the primary colours together
4.
To make a colour lighter, you can add which other paint?
White
Black
Grey
Blue
The lighter colour is then called a 'tint' of the original
5.
Reds, oranges and yellows are sometimes called what?
Spicy colours
Heated colours
Radiator colours
Warm colours
Blues, violets and greens are often called cool colours
6.
Colours which are opposite each other on the colour wheel are known as what?
Complementary
Companion
Countryside
Comfortable
Complementary colours can be used together and produce a contrast
7.
Red, yellow, blue, orange, green and violet are usually arranged on a colour what?
A colour square
A colour cube
A colour wheel
A colour sphere
The colour wheel shows the colours and their relationships to each other
8.
What are the three primary colours?
Black, white and grey
Red, yellow and blue
Pink, purple and orange
Green, brown and silver
Primary colours are the only colours which cannot be made by mixing two other colours
9.
How are tertiary colours made?
By putting all the colours in a line
By mixing every colour together
By choosing from a colour chart
By mixing a secondary colour with one of the primary colours it is made from
For example, green can be mixed with one of its primary colours, blue, to give blue-green
10.
Colours which are next to each other on the colour wheel are described as what?
Harmonious
Argumentative
Clashing
Monochromatic
Harmonious colours go well together, like yellow and orange
Author:  Angela Smith

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