Year 2 - Contractions Part 1
Learn to use contractions in your writing and stories.

Year 2 - Contractions Part 1

This 'Contractions Part 1' spelling quiz asks KS1 children to spell some of the most common contractions shown when combining two words. Possessive contractions will be addressed in Part 2. All these contractions have been taken from the National Curriculum.

Sometimes we can combine two words and turn it into one. If you push two words together, we call that a contraction. Often, when doing this we delete one or two letters and in their place we put an apostrophe. Test your knowledge on these contractions by spelling the missing words.

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1.
I ____ seen you in ages!
haven't
havenot'
hav'nt
have'nt
For this one, the apostrophe replaces one letter.
2.
I ____ believe my eyes.
couldno't
could'nt
could't
couldn't
This means he watched the magic trick and he could not believe what he saw!
3.
I ____ go in there if I was you.
wouldn't
wooldn't
woudn't
woudnt'
The words would and not are being combined here.
4.
You ____ have another biscuit.
carnt
carn't
can't
cann't
We are pushing can and not together. The apostrophe is replacing the letters 'no'.
5.
Surprise! ____ going to be a bridesmaid!
Your'e
Youre
You're
Yuor'e
It's an honour to be a bridesmaid and usually means you are close friends or relatives with the bride.
6.
____ you want to taste the broccoli?
Diddn't
Didn't
Did't
Did'nt
The two words being contracted here are did and not.
7.
____ been a long day and ____ not ended yet!
Its and its
It's and its
Its and it's
It's and it's
The first 'it's' represents the words it and has; the second 'it's' represents the words it and is.
8.
____ going to go on a diet tomorrow!
I'me
I'm
Ia'm
I'am
The word I'm is I and am squished together.
9.
You ____ go to sleep without brushing your teeth.
should'ot
shouldn't
shoudn't
shouldnt'
The apostrophe represents the missing letter - in this case, the 'o'.
10.
If you don't do as I say ____ tell your mum.
I'll
I'sle
Ais'le
I'l
The first three words are homophones, this means they sound the same. I'll, isle and aisle are all pronounced the same way but mean different things.
Author:  Finola Waller

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