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Sentences (Connectives) 01
The sentence "The sun came out and we went for a picnic" uses the connective "and". A connective is otherwise known as a conjunction.

Sentences (Connectives) 01

Sentences can be joined using connectives (conjunctions). Simple connectives, or joining words, are "and", "so", "or" and "but". Sentences without these little words don't make much sense!

Each of these connectives joins ideas in different ways in a sentence. So "and" is a very simple connective: "I like ice cream and I like chocolate". "But", like "and", is a simple connective, although its function is to introduce a contrasting idea, as in this sentence: "I like ice cream, but I do not like chocolate". The word "or" introduces alternatives, as here: "Shall we have ice cream, or would you prefer chocolate?"

As you can see, although we are able to construct very similar sentences using each of these words, they are not interchangeable. Each has a very specific function. The quiz below tests your ability to recognise the connection between two sentences and to choose the correct simple connective that will join the two sentences together logically.

Practise your skills by playing this first quiz on the subject.

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1.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
Do you like pizza? Do you prefer pasta?
Do you like pizza and do you prefer pasta?
Do you like pizza or do you prefer pasta?
Do you like pizza so do you prefer pasta?
Do you like pizza, do you prefer pasta?
"Or" introduces an alternative idea here
2.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
I'd like to go swimming. I must do my homework first.
I'd like to go swimming and I must do my homework first.
I'd like to go swimming but I must do my homework first.
I'd like to go swimming or I must do my homework first.
I'd like to go swimming, I must do my homework first.
"But" introduces the contrasting idea here, implying that the speaker will put duty before pleasure
3.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
He was late. He missed the bus.
He was late or he missed the bus.
He was late so he missed the bus.
He was late, he missed the bus.
He was late. He missed the bus.
"So" introduces the idea of consequence here. "He was late or he missed the bus" might almost make sense if the sentence had some explanation for how its two halves are related
4.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
She hit the ball. She scored a point.
She hit the ball and she scored a point.
She hit the ball or she scored a point.
She hit the ball, she scored a point.
She hit the ball. She scored a point.
"And" connects the two sentences correctly
5.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
The sun shone. We were too late to stop for a picnic.
The sun shone but we were too late to stop for a picnic.
The sun shone or we were too late to stop for a picnic.
The sun shone so we were too late to stop for a picnic.
The sun shone, we were too late to stop for a picnic.
Here "the sun shone" implies that it was pleasant weather for a picnic, while the second half of the sentence explains why the picnic was impossible despite the sunny weather
6.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
The ticket was expensive. She could just afford it.
The ticket was expensive but she could just afford it.
The ticket was expensive or she could just afford it.
The ticket was expensive she could just afford it.
The ticket was expensive, she could just afford it.
The word "just" implies that affording the ticket was difficult, although possible, and the connective "but" makes the connection between the two parts of the sentence clear
7.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
How much is this clock? Does it need batteries?
How much is this clock and does it need batteries?
How much is this clock or does it need batteries?
How much is this clock so does it need batteries?
How much is this clock, does it need batteries?
"And" connects the two sentences correctly
8.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
It was raining. We could not have our picnic.
It was raining but we could not have our picnic.
It was raining so we could not have our picnic.
It was raining, we could not have our picnic.
It was raining. We could not have our picnic.
Connectives show us how ideas relate to one another
9.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
He was late. He missed the film.
He was late but he missed the film.
He was late or he missed the film.
He was late so he missed the film.
He was late, he missed the film.
"So" introduces the consequence of the person's lateness
10.
Use simple connectives to join the following sentence correctly.
He let in the goal. His team still won the match.
He let in the goal and his team still won the match.
He let in the goal but his team still won the match.
He let in the goal, his team still won the match.
He let in the goal. His team still won the match.
"But" introduces the contrasting idea here. Using the connective "and" in this example would not show how the parts of the sentence are related

 

Author:  Sue Daish

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