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PSHE Quiz Illustration | Equality Act
We all have rights and responsibilities regarding discrimination.

The Equality Act – Age 14-16

Students in KS4 are drawing ever closer to life in the adult world. Being an adult brings certain rights but also responsibilities. In this PSHE quiz, written for students in years 9 and 10, we look at the 2010 Equality Act and how this will affect them.

After centuries of discrimination the Equality Act was introduced in 2010 to protect our rights and to make sure that everyone, regardless of age, sex, physical ability, race, religion or sexuality, has equal opportunities.

In this quiz we look at how this law protects you and also the responsibilities you have because of it.

1.
Under the Equality Act, there are nine protected “characteristics”. Which of the following is not one of them?
Disability
Gender
Height
Age
Height is not specifically mentioned in the nine characteristics. Here’s the list in full:
Age
Disability
Gender reassignment
Marriage and civil partnership
Pregnancy and maternity
Race
Religion or belief
Sex / gender
Sexual orientation
2.
Not everyone agrees with the Equality Act. Some claim it is too “PC”. What does PC stand for in this context?
Politically correct
Personally controlling
Power craving
Parent commanding
Political correctness is anything meant to avoid causing offence. In some sections of the media and popular parlance it has come to be an insult
3.
The Equality Act protects us in certain situations. Which of the following is on the list?
When you are at work
When you are at school
When you are on a bus
All of the above
Basically the act protects us whenever we might be faced with discrimination. This is generally in situations such as work or school, when we use public services like hospitals or the police, when we are in contact with government or local government, or when we are in social groups like sports clubs
4.
In 2018 a baker was taken to court three times for refusing to make a cake with the slogan “Support Gay Marriage”. According to the court, was the baker guilty of discrimination?
No, no and yes
Yes, yes and no
Yes, yes and yes
No, no and no
The baker was found guilty so appealed against the verdict. The baker lost this appeal and appealed a second time. On the third occasion the baker was found not guilty. Even the courts struggle to decide sometimes what counts as discrimination
5.
There are four specific types of discrimination. Which of these is an example of “direct discrimination”?
Turning a job applicant down because of their race
Holding a meeting open to the public in a place with no disabled access
Homophobic comments by the staff in a restaurant
Being sacked for standing as a witness in a colleague’s complaint at work
Direct discrimination is treating someone worse than another or denying them an opportunity because of a protected characteristic they have. Refusing someone club membership or promotion at work for example, because of their race, sexual orientation etc. is direct discrimination
6.
There are four specific types of discrimination. Which of these is an example of “harassment”?
Turning a job applicant down because of their race
Holding a meeting open to the public in a place with no disabled access
Homophobic comments by the staff in a restaurant
Being sacked for standing as a witness in a colleague’s complaint at work
Harassment is when someone treats you in a hostile way or abuses your dignity. Abusive comments about race, sex, ability, sexuality etc. are harassment
7.
There are four specific types of discrimination. Which of these is an example of “victimisation”?
Turning a job applicant down because of their race
Holding a meeting open to the public in a place with no disabled access
Homophobic comments by the staff in a restaurant
Being sacked for standing as a witness in a colleague’s complaint at work
Victimisation is when people treat you unfairly because you are taking action under the Equality Act or supporting someone else who is.
The fourth type (holding a meeting open to the public in a place with no disabled access) is "indirect discrimination"
8.
If you think that you are being discriminated against, who should you go to?
The perpetrator
The Citizens’ Advice Bureau
A solicitor
Any of the above
Going directly to the perpetrator is the quickest way to get an apology or some compensation. It is not legally binding though.
You could see a solicitor who would advise you of your rights, or the Citizens’ Advice who will talk you through all your options
9.
The Equality Act says discrimination can be justified if the person discriminating can show it is a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim. Three of the following are “legitimate aims” and one is not. Which one is not?
Health and safety
Having an efficient service
Religious persuasion
Aim to make profit
In the legal world, lawful discrimination is known as “objective justification”
10.
Local authorities must find out what effect any changes they plan to make affect minorities. What must they do if a minority is adversely affected by any change?
Look for ways to fix the problem
Abandon any changes
Carry on with the changes
Pay compensation to the minority
Public bodies must find out how their decisions affect people with protected characteristics. They must also have evidence to show what they have done
Author:  Graeme Haw

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