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Insects and Spiders - Butterflies 2
This quiz features one of our rarest butterflies. This picture shows the wing in glorious detail.

Insects and Spiders - Butterflies 2

The butterfly image is used extensively in arts and crafts. Due to the nature of its symmetrical shape and stunning colours, it is a very versatile image. From textiles to pottery to jewellery, butterflies are a popular addition.

If one is nervous, for instance before an interview, the descriptive expression "I've got butterflies in my stomach" is often said.

To see a larger image, click on the picture.
1.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Velela
Marsh Fritillary
Small Skipper
Northern Brown Argus
Large Heath
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Lycaenidae
  • Genus: Aricia
  • Species: A. artaxerxes
  • Colonies tend to be small, with less than 50 adults.
  • In England the species is locally distributed in Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Cumbria and County Durham.
  • This butterfly has a single brood.
  • Flies low to the ground over flowering grasslands.
2.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Svdmolen
Purple Hairstreak
Small Copper
Purple Emperor
Pearl-bordered Fritillary
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Lycaenidae
  • Genus: Neozephyrus
  • Species: N. quercus
  • Small, active butterfly.
  • Often spotted fluttering high around oak trees.
  • Main adult food source is honeydew.
  • Fly more often during the evening of a warm summer's day.
3.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Darius Baužys
Heath Fritillary
Silver-spotted Skipper
Small Heath
Grayling
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Nymphalidae
  • Genus: Melitaea
  • Species: M. athalia
  • Historically, this butterfly has been linked with the traditional practice of woodland coppicing.
  • This has given it the local name of the 'Woodman's Follower' as it follows the cycle of cutting around a wood.
  • One of our rarest butterflies.
4.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of JJ Harrison
Common Brimstone
Wood White
White Admiral
Small White
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Pieridae
  • Genus: Pieris
  • Species: P. rapae
  • Widespread and common throughout the UK.
  • Breeds on brassicas and Nasturtium.
  • Adults are attracted to white flowers for feeding and for camouflage.
  • Large numbers can sometimes be seen in Oil-seed Rape fields.
5.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Ettore Balocchi
Small Heath
Swallowtail
Common Blue
Speckled Wood
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Nymphalidae
  • Genus: Pararge
  • Species: P. aegeria
  • Often perch in sunny spots.
  • Can be seen spiralling into the air to chase each other.
  • Unique among British butterflies because it can overwinter in two stages, as both a larva and pupa.
6.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Philipp Schäufele
Small Tortoiseshell
Green Hairstreak
Dingy Skipper
Duke of Burgundy
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Nymphalidae
  • Genus: Aglais
  • Species: A. urticae
  • Very common garden butterfly.
  • If this butterfly feels threatened, it will open its wings rapidy.
  • The display of colours can frighten away inexperienced birds.
  • Foodplant is nettles.
7.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Hans Hillewaert
Essex Skipper
Dark Clouded Yellow
Ringlet
Small Tortoiseshell
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Pieridae
  • Genus: Colias
  • Species: C. croceus
  • This butterfly is a small, fast-flying migrant.
  • Famous for occasional mass migrations.
  • Can be spotted on the south coast nearly every year in varying numbers.
  • At rest, their wings remain closed.
8.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of http://www.lucnix.be/main.php
Scotch Argus
Red Admiral
Ringlet
Essex Skipper
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Nymphalidae
  • Genus: Vanessa
  • Species: V. atalanta
  • One of our most well-known butterflies.
  • A frequent visitor to British gardens.
  • Although considered a resident, it is primarily a migrant to this country.
  • Can be found practically anywhere, from the coast to urban gardens to mountain tops.
9.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Svdmolen
Chequered Skipper
Grayling
Small White
Silver-spotted Skipper
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Hesperiidae
  • Genus: Hesperia
  • Species: H. comma
  • Its distribution is chalk downland sites in southern England.
  • This butterfly appears late in the year, July or early August.
  • It has a low, darting flight.
  • One of the few species that is increasing its range.
10.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Hectonichus
Orange Tip
Lulworth Skipper
Holly Blue
Red Admiral
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Lycaenidae
  • Genus: Celastrina
  • Species: C. argiolus
  • Widespread and often seen in parks and gardens.
  • Renowned for wildly fluctuating in numbers.
  • This is believed to be caused by parasitism from the wasp Listrodomus nychemerus.

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