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Insects and Spiders - Butterflies 2
This quiz features one of our rarest butterflies. This picture shows the wing in glorious detail.

Insects and Spiders - Butterflies 2

The butterfly image is used extensively in arts and crafts. Due to the nature of its symmetrical shape and stunning colours, it is a very versatile image. From textiles to pottery to jewellery, butterflies are a popular addition.

If one is nervous, for instance before an interview, the descriptive expression "I've got butterflies in my stomach" is often said.

To see a larger image, click on the picture.
1.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Svdmolen
Chequered Skipper
Grayling
Small White
Silver-spotted Skipper
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Hesperiidae
  • Genus: Hesperia
  • Species: H. comma
  • Its distribution is chalk downland sites in southern England.
  • This butterfly appears late in the year, July or early August.
  • It has a low, darting flight.
  • One of the few species that is increasing its range.
2.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Hectonichus
Orange Tip
Lulworth Skipper
Holly Blue
Red Admiral
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Lycaenidae
  • Genus: Celastrina
  • Species: C. argiolus
  • Widespread and often seen in parks and gardens.
  • Renowned for wildly fluctuating in numbers.
  • This is believed to be caused by parasitism from the wasp Listrodomus nychemerus.
3.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Darius Baužys
Heath Fritillary
Silver-spotted Skipper
Small Heath
Grayling
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Nymphalidae
  • Genus: Melitaea
  • Species: M. athalia
  • Historically, this butterfly has been linked with the traditional practice of woodland coppicing.
  • This has given it the local name of the 'Woodman's Follower' as it follows the cycle of cutting around a wood.
  • One of our rarest butterflies.
4.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Velela
Marsh Fritillary
Small Skipper
Northern Brown Argus
Large Heath
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Lycaenidae
  • Genus: Aricia
  • Species: A. artaxerxes
  • Colonies tend to be small, with less than 50 adults.
  • In England the species is locally distributed in Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Cumbria and County Durham.
  • This butterfly has a single brood.
  • Flies low to the ground over flowering grasslands.
5.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Hans Hillewaert
Essex Skipper
Dark Clouded Yellow
Ringlet
Small Tortoiseshell
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Pieridae
  • Genus: Colias
  • Species: C. croceus
  • This butterfly is a small, fast-flying migrant.
  • Famous for occasional mass migrations.
  • Can be spotted on the south coast nearly every year in varying numbers.
  • At rest, their wings remain closed.
6.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Philipp Schäufele
Small Tortoiseshell
Green Hairstreak
Dingy Skipper
Duke of Burgundy
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Nymphalidae
  • Genus: Aglais
  • Species: A. urticae
  • Very common garden butterfly.
  • If this butterfly feels threatened, it will open its wings rapidy.
  • The display of colours can frighten away inexperienced birds.
  • Foodplant is nettles.
7.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of http://www.lucnix.be/main.php
Scotch Argus
Red Admiral
Ringlet
Essex Skipper
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Nymphalidae
  • Genus: Vanessa
  • Species: V. atalanta
  • One of our most well-known butterflies.
  • A frequent visitor to British gardens.
  • Although considered a resident, it is primarily a migrant to this country.
  • Can be found practically anywhere, from the coast to urban gardens to mountain tops.
8.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Svdmolen
Purple Hairstreak
Small Copper
Purple Emperor
Pearl-bordered Fritillary
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Lycaenidae
  • Genus: Neozephyrus
  • Species: N. quercus
  • Small, active butterfly.
  • Often spotted fluttering high around oak trees.
  • Main adult food source is honeydew.
  • Fly more often during the evening of a warm summer's day.
9.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of JJ Harrison
Common Brimstone
Wood White
White Admiral
Small White
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Pieridae
  • Genus: Pieris
  • Species: P. rapae
  • Widespread and common throughout the UK.
  • Breeds on brassicas and Nasturtium.
  • Adults are attracted to white flowers for feeding and for camouflage.
  • Large numbers can sometimes be seen in Oil-seed Rape fields.
10.
Can you identify this butterfly?
Photograph courtesy of Ettore Balocchi
Small Heath
Swallowtail
Common Blue
Speckled Wood
  • Order: Lepidoptera
  • Family: Nymphalidae
  • Genus: Pararge
  • Species: P. aegeria
  • Often perch in sunny spots.
  • Can be seen spiralling into the air to chase each other.
  • Unique among British butterflies because it can overwinter in two stages, as both a larva and pupa.

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