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Adjectives 2
Her professor was the man who had the most influence on her future choice of career.

Adjectives 2

In this second quiz on adjectives, you are going to get some practice in using adjectives to compare things and ideas. There are three forms: the positive, comparative and superlative forms. What is the difference between these three forms? The positive is the base adjective, the comparative is more than the base and the superlative is the most. So let's take the word 'nice' as our example.

  • The positive is the word nice
  • The comparative is the word nicer
  • The superlative is the word nicest

Okay! Let's go! - and watch out for those irregular comparatives. As a tip, you might want to try our 11-Plus English Adjectives 1 quiz before you play this quiz.

1.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
Studying for the chemistry exam was ... than studying for the maths exam.
easyer
easier
easiest
the more easier
Don't forget to CHANGE y TO i BEFORE you add on the -er/est: 'easy-easier-easiest'. Only two things are being compared, so you need the comparative -er of easy: easier. When the adjective ends in a consonant (any letter other that the vowels a, e, i, o, u) and -y, you must change the -y to an -i. For example: happy-happier-happiest
2.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
Dave would like a ... sugar in his tea; Peter would like ... sugar than Dave, and Bill would like ... sugar of all.
little, less, the least
little, least, less
less, little, least
least, less, little
'Less' has an irregular form: 'little-less-least'. Dave is simply stating how much sugar he wants, so the adjective remains in the positive form - unchanged. Peter is stating how much sugar he wants in comparison to Dave, so the adjective goes into the comparative. Finally, Bill is stating how much sugar he wants in comparison to the other two people, so the adjective goes into the superlative
3.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
The Missouri river is ... river in the USA, but the river Nile is ... it.
the longest, longer than
the longest, longest than
the long, longer than
the longer, the longer than
Superlative for the Missouri - yes! it's not the Mississippi - because you are comparing one river with all the other rivers in the USA. Comparative for the Nile because you are comparing it with only one other river - the Missouri. Don't forget: one syllable adjectives form their comparative forms by adding -er and -est: you use the -er form and 'than' when you are comparing two objects or ideas, but you MUST use 'the' and the -est form when you are comparing more than two objects or ideas
4.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
John is as ... as Arthur once he has set his mind to something.
obstinater
more obstinate
the obstinatest
obstinate
The 'as...as...' syntax (sentence form) requires the adjective to be in the 'positive' form: unchanged. By the way, here's a useful definition: 'obstinate' means stubborn, determined or pigheaded
5.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
In his latest album, the rock star wrote ... songs he has ever written.
the best
the goodest
the better
the bestest
This sentence requires the superlative form of the adjective because you are comparing the songs on this album (one album of songs) with all the other songs that he has ever written. Unfortunately, you can't say 'the goodest' because good has an irregular form: good-better-best. Another important adjective that falls into this category is 'bad-worse-worst'. The form of the adjective that doesn't change is called the 'positive' form: good, bad, beautiful and so on
6.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
The ... you study the ... the knowledge you gain.
hard, greater
hard, great
more hard, more great
harder, greater
The 'the...the...' syntax (sentence form) requires the adjective to be in the comparative form: in this case, you add -er to the end of each adjective
7.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
Her professor was the man who had ... on her future choice of career.
the influencest
the most influencest
the most influence
the mostest influence
This sentence requires the superlative form of the adjective because you are comparing the professor's influence with the influence of all the other people. As a "rule of thumb" if you have large adjectives (strictly speaking: words of more than two syllables) you have to use 'the' and 'most' or 'least' when forming the superlative. For example, 'This is the most exciting party that I have ever been to'. By the way, here's a useful definition: 'influential' means important, having the ability to make people do what you think is right
8.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
Paul has two big trees in his back garden, but the oak tree is ... the ash tree.
the more taller
the most tallest
taller than
tallest
One syllable adjectives form their comparative and superlative forms by adding -er and -est: you use the -er form and 'than' when you are comparing two objects or ideas, but you MUST use 'the' and the -est form when you are comparing more than two objects or ideas. For example: 'This tree is taller than my neighbour's tree' (two trees compared). 'This is the tallest tree in the forest' (one tree compared with all the other trees in the forest, which number two or more)
9.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
Shopping at the supermarket is ... shopping at the corner shop.
economicaler than
the economicalest
more economical than
the most economical than
As a "rule of thumb" if you have large adjectives (strictly speaking: words of more than two syllables) you have to use 'more' or 'less' and 'than' when making comparisons. For example: 'She is more beautiful than my sister'. You can't say: 'She is beautifuler than my sister'. By the way, here's a useful definition: 'economical' means cheap, not too expensive
10.
Complete the sentence with the correct forms of the adjectives.
The kitten is ... than the puppy.
playfuler
more playful
the playfuler
playerful
Be on the look out for adjectives that end in -ful and -less: 'useful/useless', 'careful/careless', 'harmful/harmless', 'homeless' (there is NO 'homeful'), and so on. Only two things are being compared, so you need the comparative: more playful. The superlative would be the most playful
Author:  Frank Evans

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