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Verbs
You will get the part if you perform well in the rehearsals.

Verbs

Verbs describe actions, states or conditions, for example:

  • 'Peter is running fast'. The main verb here is 'run': although it is written in the continuous tense
  • 'John loves Mary'. The main verb here is 'love': although it is written in the present simple tense
  • 'The cat broke the bottle of milk'. The main verb here is 'break': although it is written in the past simple tense
  • 'He had seen her before'. The main verb here is 'see': although it is written in the past perfect tense

Try this 11-plus English quiz and get some practice in identifying the main verbs. The verbs won't always be in their dictionary forms. Don't forget: verbs in their dictionary forms have no endings.

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1.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
He felt exhausted after the long walk.
feel
felt
felt, exhaust
exhausted
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'feel-felt-felt'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'feel' is an irregular verb
2.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
He had bought a large abandoned house in the countryside.
had bought
abandoned
buy
large, abandon
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'buy-bought-bought'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'buy' is an irregular verb
3.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
He was running so fast that he fell and hurt himself.
run, fall, hurt
was running, fall, hurt
ran, fell, hurt
run, fall, hurted
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'run-ran-run'; 'fall-fell-fallen'; 'hurt-hurt-hurt'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'run', 'fall' and 'hurt' are irregular verbs
4.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
You will get the part if you perform well in the rehearsals.
get, perfomed
got, perform
get, perform, well
get, perform
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'get-got-got'; 'perform-performed-performed'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'get' is an irregular verb, but 'perform' is a regular verb
5.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
She loved Paris immensely and she really liked St. Germain.
love, like
love, immensely
like
love, like, really
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'love-loved-loved'; 'like-liked-liked'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'love' and 'like' are regular verbs
6.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
I have read all the letters, but I haven't written all the replies.
have read, written
read, write
have write, have read
writed, readed
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'read-read-read'; 'write-wrote-written'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'read' and 'write' are irregular verbs
7.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
He stole the money and hid in the countryside.
stole, hide
steal, hid
steal, hide
steal, hidded
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'steal-stole-stolen'; 'hide-hid-hidden'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'steal' and 'hide' are irregular verbs
8.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
He opened the door, walked in, and sat down.
opened, walk, sat
open, walk, sit
opened, walked, satted
open, walked, sit
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'open-opened-opened'; 'walk-walked-walked'; 'sit-sat-sat'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'open' and 'walk' are regular verbs, but 'sit' is an irregular verb
9.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
He closed his bedroom door quietly and crept downstairs.
close, quietly
creep, close, quietly
close, creep
quietly
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'close-closed-closed'; 'creep-crept-crept'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'creep' is an irregular verb
10.
What are the dictionary forms of the main verbs used in the sentence below?
He hadn't seen or heard from her for over a year.
hadn't seen, hear
seen, heard
see, heard
see, hear
In English, verbs have three parts: infinitive-past-past participle. Don't worry if you don't understand what these terms mean. For now, just learn the three parts of a verb: 'see-saw-seen'; 'hear-heard-heard'. If the past and past participle both end in -ed, the verbs are called regular verbs; otherwise, they are called irregular verbs: 'see' and 'hear' are irregular verbs
Author:  Frank Evans

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