Making words from larger words quiz illustration | Lumberjack
Make a 6-letter word from the letters in 'lumberjack'.

Making Words from Larger Words 3

One way to exercise your brain, and to expand your vocabulary at the same time, is to try making shorter words from longer ones. That’s what this section of quizzes is all about. But it’s not just an exercise – trying your hand at these puzzles will prepare you for facing these kinds of question if you come across them in your 11+ Verbal Reasoning exam.

After each question you will be shown four possible answers and asked which one means a certain thing. If you do not know the answer, don’t despair. You’ll find that you can often work it out through a process of elimination. Look at the options and rule out any that you do know the meaning of – unless they match the meaning given in the question of course!

Take your time and don’t rush through the quiz. For example, if you are looking for a 6-letter word make sure you don’t click on one with 5 or 7 letters! You would be surprised just how often candidates in exams make simple mistakes – make sure you don’t fall into that trap!

Example:
From the word IMPORTANCE, form new words having the following meanings (the number of letters in the words is given by the number of dashes, so you do not have to use all the letters):

Tighten: _ _ _ _ _
Two parts of the eye: _ _ _ _ _ _ AND _ _ _ _ _ _
A form of transport: _ _ _ _ _
Writer of verse: _ _ _ _
Close: _ _ _ _

'Cramp' can be made, and it is a five-letter word meaning ‘tighten’.
Both ‘cornea’ and ‘retina’ are parts of the eye that can be made from the letters.
The form of transport is 'train' (not 'car' as there are five letters in the answer, rather than three).
A writer of verse is a 'poet', and the required letters are all there.
The word meaning ‘close’ (rhymes with ‘dose’, not ‘rose’) is 'near'.
1.
Using the letters from the word OCCUPATION, make a 4-letter word which is a type of fish.
Cat
Coot
Tuna
Pact
All of the options can be formed from the given letters, but only three of them are animals - a ‘pact’ is an agreement. A ‘coot’ is a type of duck, and so not a fish. Whilst there is such a thing as a catfish, a ‘cat’ is not a fish – it’s also only 3 letters. The answer is ‘tuna’
2.
Using the letters from the word CEREBELLUM, make a 5-letter word meaning ‘money’.
Creme
Crumb
Celeb
Lucre
All of the four options are genuine words you can make from the letters in ‘cerebellum'. Someone earning very little money might be said to be living on ‘crumbs’. ‘Celebs’ earn lots of money, and the creme de la creme (the very best) might also be rich. All of these come close to literally meaning ‘money’, but the only one which actually does is ‘lucre' (think of the phrase ‘filthy lucre’).
3.
Using the letters from the word BACTERIA, make a 4-letter unit of land measurement.
Acre
Area
Tier
Rice
All of the options are genuine 4-letter words which can be made from the given letters, but only one of them is a unit of land measurement. A ‘tier’ is a level or row. Whilst ‘rice’ can be grown on land, it is not a unit of measurement. We can measure the ‘area’ of land in ‘acres’, so the answer is ‘acre’
4.
Using the letters from the word RAINFOREST, make a 7-letter word which is a crime.
Terrain
Nastier
Treason
Refrain
All of the options are genuine 7-letter words which can be made from the given letters. ‘Refrain’ means to stop yourself doing something and ‘terrain’ is the features of land. The answer is ‘treason’
5.
Using the letters from the word WARMONGER, make a 5-letter word which is an emotion.
Groan
Anger
Range
Gnome
All of the options can be made from the letters, but neither ‘groan’ nor ‘gnome’ are emotions. Whilst one can have a ‘range’ of emotions, the word itself is not an emotion. The answer is ‘anger’
6.
Using the letters from the word LACKLUSTRE, make a 6-letter word which is an item of crockery.
Racket
Castle
Laurel
Saucer
All four options are genuine 6-letter words that can be made from the given letters, however, only one of them is an item of crockery. The answer is ‘saucer’
7.
Using the letters from the word LUMBERJACK, make a 6-letter word meaning ‘to bend under pressure’
Camber
Jumble
Muckle
Buckle
A ‘jumble’ is an untidy mix of things. A ‘camber’ is a curve or bend on a road surface. A ‘muckle’ is a large amount of something and is a Scottish word. The answer is ‘buckle’
8.
Using the letters from the word OVERBOOKED, make a 4-letter word meaning ‘a crucifix’.
Rook
Rood
Boor
Beer
All four options are genuine 4-letter words. Only ‘rood' matches the definition though. ‘Beer’ is a drink and a ‘rook’ is a type of bird or one of the pieces in chess. A ‘boor’ is a person with bad manners. The answer is ‘rood’
9.
Using the letters from the word FASCINATION, make a 5-letter word meaning ‘a person who can endure hardship without complaining’.
Scion
Satin
Stoic
Sonic
You already know what ‘satin’ and ‘sonic;’ mean, I should think. A ‘scion’ is the offshoot of a plant and the ‘Stoics’ were philosophers in Ancient Greece who practised remaining calm and not showing any emotion. Today the word has come to mean ‘uncomplaining’
10.
Using the letters from the word ABSOLUTELY, make a 6-letter form of art.
Ballet
Boules
Blues
Tables
‘Tables’ are more functional items than pieces of art, and ‘boules’ is a game similar to bowls. ‘Blues’ is a kind of music and so a form of art, however, it is only 5 letters long. The answer is ‘ballet’
Author:  Stephen O'Hara and Ian Miles

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