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Asking Questions
Do you know how to change a sentence into a question?

Asking Questions

Get ready for a fun KS2 English quiz all about asking questions! Punctuation is like magic when we ask questions in writing.

In Spanish, they have an upside-down question mark at the start. In English, we rely on word order. 'You are' becomes 'Are you?' – see how the words flip? Take this quiz and become a question wizard! Test your question-making skills and have a blast!

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1.
Change this statement into a question.
The radiators are not working.
Are the radiators not working.
Are the radiators not working?
Are not the radiators working.
The radiators are working?
Often the word order has to change quite a bit when you turn a statement into a question.
2.
Change this statement into a question.
You are excited about the school trip.
You are? Excited about the school trip?
Are you excited about the school trip.
Are you excited about the school trip?
Am I excited about the school trip?
Punctuation is important when writing English.
3.
Change this statement into a question.
You are eleven years old today.
Are you eleven years old today.
You are eleven years old? today?
Are you eleven years old today?
Eleven? Years old? Today?
The last answer is not correct, but would work very well when writing dialogue.
4.
Change this statement into a question.
I can smell something delicious cooking for tea.
I can smell something delicious cooking for tea?
Can I smell something delicious cooking for tea.
Can I smell something delicious cooking for tea?
Is something delicious cooking for tea?
The last answer makes sense but forgets to mention smell.
5.
Change this statement into a question.
A terrible storm is on its way.
Is a terrible storm on its way.
Is a terrible storm on its way?
Are you worried about the storm on its way?
A terrible storm? Is on its way.
All sentences must end with a form of punctuation.
6.
Change this statement into a question.
Let's take the train to London.
Let's take the train to London?
Us let take the train to London.
Us let take the train to London?
Shall we take the train to London?
'Let's' = 'let us' - the only way to turn this into a question is to use 'shall we'.
7.
Change this statement into a question.
He has wanted to be a doctor since he was a child.
Has he wanted to be a doctor since he was a child?
Has he wanted to be a doctor since he was a child.
Did he want to be a doctor since he was a child?
Does he want to be a doctor since he was a child?
'He has' simply becomes 'has he'.
8.
Change this statement into a question.
I like chocolate.
You like chocolate?
Yes.
Do I like chocolate.
Do I like chocolate?
'Do I like chocolate?' is an example of a rhetorical question. You wouldn't really expect someone else to answer that for you!
9.
Change this statement into a question.
We will be visiting the museum later today.
Will we be visiting the museum later today?
Will we be visiting the museum later today.
Is the museum open later today?
The museum will be open later today?
In some instances, you might hear this as a question: 'We will be visiting the museum later today?' - using this word order would only be as a repetition of the original statement in order to express surprise.
10.
Change this statement into a question.
My favourite toy has disappeared.
Has my favourite toy disappeared?
My favourite toy disappeared has?
Has my favourite toy disappeared.
Where is my favourite toy?
Don't forget to add the question mark.
You can find more about this topic by visiting BBC Bitesize - Four types of sentence

Author:  Sheri Smith

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