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Writing Instructions
Take the dog for a walk.

Writing Instructions

This KS2 English quiz takes a look at writing instructions. A written instruction is usually a direction or order. 'Take out your books', 'Underline the key words', 'Take the dog for a walk', 'Shut the door!' - you will be very familiar with instructions. Sometimes instructions need to be much longer than just one sentence, however. If you are telling someone how to do something a bit complicated, you might write it down in a set of instructions.

You will have no doubt come across a list of instructions, perhaps when using a recipe or when putting something together.

See how well you know the difference between instructions and other types of writing by trying this English quiz.

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1.
Instructions are written using what type of verbs?
Future tense
Imperative
Passive
Third person
Imperative verbs are sometimes called 'bossy' verbs.
2.
Instructions are written step by step. These steps should be ____
complicated.
simple.
numbered.
unusual.
They are numbered because instructions normally follow an order.
3.
Which of these would NOT make a good title for instructions?
How to care for your pet chinchilla.
How to make an origami crane.
Why you should learn to play the violin.
Chocolate Cake Recipe.
Instructions will always tell you what you will achieve if you follow them.
4.
Which of the following is true?
Instructions try to persuade you to do something.
Instructions are always written.
Instructions are collections of factual information about a topic.
Instructions tell you what to do and how to do it.
Instructions can be spoken or written.
5.
Which of the following is NOT an example of an instruction?
Could you wash your hands before you begin.
Don't run.
Fold the paper along the dotted line.
Whisk the cream until thick.
'Whisk', 'fold' and 'don't run' are examples of imperative (bossy) verbs. 'Wash your hands before you begin' would be an instruction.
6.
Which of the following set of instructions is in the correct order?
Turn on the tap, soap your hands, rinse your hands, turn off the tap, dry your hands.
Rinse your hands, turn on the tap, turn off the tap, soap your hands, dry your hands.
Soap your hands, turn off the tap, dry your hands, turn on the tap, rinse your hands.
Dry your hands, turn on the tap, soap your hands, rinse your hands, turn off the tap.
Using connectives would improve these instructions: First, turn on the tap. Then soap your hands. Next, rinse your hands...
7.
Instructions should have a list of ____
ingredients or equipment needed.
other people who have followed the instructions.
photos.
reasons why you should follow them.
This is so you know what you will need.
8.
Which of these connectives should be used in a set of instructions?
Yet, for, because, otherwise.
On the other hand, because, so, secondly.
Therefore, next, however, although.
First, next, then, finally.
Your instructions should be written using 'time connectives', such as 'first', 'next', 'then' and 'finally', to emphasise the correct order for following the steps.
9.
Many types of writing use instructions. Which of these does NOT use instructions?
List of safety rules.
Craft how-to guide.
Letters page in a newspaper.
Board games.
Instructions are important in a board game - otherwise how would you know how to play it?!
10.
Diagrams or photos help by ____
explaining why it's important to follow the instructions.
showing the reader what to do.
making the instructions seem more difficult.
None of the above.
When putting together a toy or game, diagrams can show us which pieces belong where.

 

Author:  Sheri Smith

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