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PSHE quiz illustration | Gambling
Are you more likely to win the lottery or be struck by lightning?

Gambling - Age 11-14

In this quiz, written for KS3 children in years 7, 8 and 9, we take a look at gambling and the risks associated with it. For most of us, gambling is a harmless pastime, but it can be addictive so children need to know some strategies for coping with it and making sure it does not become a problem.

Almost all of us gamble from time to time. A lotto ticket, a scratch card, a bet on the football results, or even a raffle ticket. These are all forms of gambling. But for some, gambling can become a problem.

Like certain drugs, gambling can be addictive. You know you have a problem if you are spending money you cannot afford on gambling. So, what can you do to protect yourself? Well, you can start by playing this quiz!

1.
Figures from The Royal College of Psychiatrists show that how many Britons in every thousand have a problem with gambling?
1 in every thousand
9 in every thousand
19 in every thousand
90 in every thousand
Problems with gambling arise when it leads to debt. Many have little control over the amount they spend, and this can lead to them losing their homes and destroying their relationships
2.
How does a gambling addict feel when they make a bet?
Invincible
Sad
Hopeful
Scared
According to psychologists gambling addicts feel “alive”, “invincible” or “powerful” when they make a bet. This “rush” is addictive and that is what causes gambling to become a problem
3.
Which of these is gambling?
Buying a lotto ticket
Betting on horse races
Buying a raffle ticket
They are all gambling
Playing any game of chance which involves giving money is gambling. Many do not see raffles as gambling but technically they are
4.
Which of these in NOT a sign you may have a gambling problem?
You bet larger amounts to feel the same as you used to
You bet occasionally and never more than you can afford
You borrow or sell to get gambling money
You bet more than you can afford to lose
The other three options are all signs that your gambling is getting out of control. If you notice any of them then please seek help
5.
From October 2017 – September 2018, how much money was spent in the UK on gambling?
£14.5 million
£145 million
£14.5 billion
£145 billion
That is a heck of a lot of money. It’s an average of about £220 per person
6.
What should you do if you think you might have gambling problems?
Have yourself excluded from gambling
Talk to someone about your worries
Contact a gamblers support group
Any of the above
The first thing is to notice that you have a problem. That is often the hardest part. Once you have done this then you can follow one or more routes:
Talking to a friend of family member about the issue often helps. If you prefer, you can contact a support group such as Gamblers Anonymous. Another measure you can take is to have your name added to a list of those excluded from gambling. Betting companies are not allowed to serve anyone on the list
7.
What should you do if a friend of yours is having gambling problems?
Tell their parents
Report them to the police
Talk to their doctor about it
Tell them about your concerns
If another person's gambling is getting out of hand they may not have realised they have a problem.
There are groups friends and family of gamblers can contact. For example GamCare or GamAnon
8.
Which of these events is least likely to happen?
You are struck by lightning
You die from a bee or wasp sting
You are killed by a falling asteroid
You win the lottery main prize
None of these are likely to happen. Just for comparison, here are the odds in order of likelihood:
You die from a bee or wasp sting - 1 : 79,842
You are struck by lightning – 1 : 1,101,000
You win the lottery main prize - 1 : 45,057,474
You are killed by a falling asteroid – 1 : 74,817,414
9.
How old must you be before you can buy a lottery ticket?
14
16
18
21
Most age restricted products require buyers to be 18. Not so lotto tickets. You can buy them when you are just 16 years old
10.
Which of the following is a sign that you like something but are not addicted to it?
You crave the thing you like
You hurt others to do the thing you like
You can stop if you want to
You do things you wouldn’t usually to get the thing you like
If something you like doing hurts you or others then you would stop, but not if you are addicted. You may also feel cravings for or have an obsession with an addiction. Another sign is that you are doing things which would normally be against your nature, such as stealing to feed your addiction
Author:  Graeme Haw

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