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My Family and I - Family Words and Terms
How many in-laws do you have?

My Family and I - Family Words and Terms

Quiz playing is a wonderful way to increase your knowledge of English as a Second Language. Remember that all of our ESL quizzes have titles that are both friendly and technical at the same time… In the case of this quiz you might like to tell your friends about the quiz called “My Family and I” but your teacher will probably want you to learn about "Family Words and Terms". If you hear a technical term and you want to find a quiz about the subject then just look through the list of quiz titles until you find what you need.

This quiz is mainly about the names given to your family members. For instance your father's brother is your "Uncle" whilst the daughter of your mother's sister is your "Niece". To take that one stage further, you will find that you also need to learn about terms to explain a relationship e.g."Non Identical Twins". Without knowing these family words and terms you will never understand who is related to who!

1.
Which of these is the best description of two children (a girl and a boy) who were born to the same mother on the same occasion?
Siblings
Triplets
Identical twins
Non-identical twins
Bear in mind that although the children share a birthday, there is clearly a difference between them!
2.
Which of these is the correct English 'label' for the woman who married your brother last year?
Brother-in-law
Sister-in-law
Step-brother
Step-sister
English has a very special way to describe a new relationship by marriage.
3.
Only one of these makes full, correct sense in English: which one is it?
My brother's sons are my cousins.
My brother's daughters are my cousins.
My brother's sons are my nieces.
My brother's daughters are my nieces.
'Cousin' may not be quite as broad a term in English as it is in your own language.
4.
Which of these best describes the following news?
'His sister is a priest, so she married him last February.'
Completely impossible
Unlikely
Possible
Certain
No sister is allowed to get married to her brother, of course ... but in some English churches we have women priests (= female ministers), who would be able to 'marry two other people' - in the sense of leading the ceremony when those two become a couple. In this sense, might she be able to 'marry her own brother'? Think about it!
5.
Only one of these makes full, correct sense in English: which one is it?
Their daughter married an Australian, so now they have small-children 'down under'.
Their daughter married an Australian, so now they have great-children 'down under'.
Their daughter married an Australian, so now they have grandchildren 'down under'.
Their daughter married an Australian, so now they have little children 'down under'.
The children may well be small still, but (unlike in French, for instance) we don't say that in English. There is one word that we always use for a relationship across two generations, regardless of whether we are going 'up' or 'down' the family tree.
6.
Only one of these makes full, correct sense in English: which one is it?
Sam's aunt's new husband is called Laurence, so he has become her uncle.
Sam's aunt's new husband is called Laurence, so he has become her nephew.
Sam's aunt's new husband is called Laurence, so he has become her niece.
Sam's aunt's new husband is called Laurence, so she has become his cousin.
'Sam' could be a male person (= Samuel) or a female person (= Samantha) in English, but in fact this doesn't make much difference to the situation. Be careful, though: Laurence is a man's name in English. That should help you work out the only correct answer.
7.
Which of these words do we use to describe an unfortunate person whose parents have both died?
A widow
A spinster
A singleton
An orphan
Each of these carries a suggestion of someone who is alone (newly alone, or perhaps they always were, for whatever reason) ... but only one is completely accurate in these circumstances.
8.
Which of these is the right word to identify the female children that your mother had with her previous partner?
Half-brothers
Step-brothers
Step-sisters
Half-sisters
Think: are you describing a relationship by marriage, or a one where you have 'blood' in common with these people?
9.
Only one of these makes full, correct sense in English: which one is it?
You become a fiance(e) once you are married to someone.
You become a fiance(e) once you are engaged to someone.
You become a fiance(e) when you are separated from someone.
You become a fiance(e) when you are divorced from someone.
Clearly it can only be one of these stages; but which one? Try eliminating the ones that you know cannot be right!
10.
Only one of these makes full, correct sense in English: which one is it?
His sister has been a widow since her husband died.
His sister has been a widower since her husband died.
His sister has been a widower since her husband remarried.
His brother has been a widow since his wife remarried.
If you check the connections outwards from the word 'widow' (or 'widower'), only one of these can be right.
Author:  Ian Miles

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